Militaria

//Militaria
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  • message from the falklands
    The life and gallant death of David Tinker, Lieut. R.N. from his letters and poems.
  • anzac's story

    Roy Kyle started writing his remarkable story at the age of 89 and almost completed his story before he died.  Bryce Courtenay was asked to edit Roy's work with a view to it being published. Roy was a typical Anzac, fiercely patriotic and prepared to give his life for King and Country.  He couldn't wait to 'have a go' and enlisted at 17.  He then found himself in a trench at Lone Pine on his 18th birthday.  He was one of the last to leave Gallipolli, then serving in Egypt and later at the Somme.  There are literally hundreds of books written by high-ranking officers, historians and military experts on the part played by the Anzacs in the Dardennelles Campaign - but very few by the ordinary soldier.

  • Nancy Wake

    In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.

  • hinge factor

    From the Wooden Horse of Troy to the Gulf War, military history has been as much marked by chance and error as gallantry and heroism.  Here is an entertaining observation that shows how many conflicts have been decided by the caprices of weather, bad intelligence or individual incompetence. In military terms, the incident that swings a battle from victory to defeat in a moment is known as the Hinge Factor. Features:  Agincourt, Waterloo, Balaclava, The Bismarck, the Gulf War and many other crucially historic military moments.

  • Soldiering On

    The Australian Army at Home and Overseas, by Some of the Boys and published by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1942.  Chapters include: Star Over Bethlehem; Diggers in Britain; Midnight Messiah; Purple's Pup; Arab Justice; Digger v. Doughboy and so much more.  Our boys' impressions of Christmas in a cold climate and local customs as well as the American servicemen and women here in Australia.  The colour plates, interestingly, are pasted in. Tales, jokes, sketches, cartoons and  on-the-spot experiences a-plenty. Illustrated in colour and black and white. A treasure mine of information.

  • prisoners of war

    From 1942 - 1945, some 22,000 Australian Service Personnel - including 71 women of the Australian Army Nursing Service - become prisoners-of-war of the Japanese. They were held in camps in Timor, Java, Sumatra, New Guinea, Borneo, Singapore, Malaya and other locations including Japan. Only 14,000 survived those three and a half years after varying experiences at the hands of their captors.  One of Nelson's earliest memories is waiting at a small country railway station to meet a returning prisoner-of-war. The man, a frail figure in a too-big army uniform, hesitated in front of a line of cheering children. Uncertain as to what was expected of him, he looked around, perhaps thought about making a speech then walked away. He was one of those 14,000 who could never fully share with anyone who was not there. Here is the story of those years. With illustrations and maps.

  • Jungle Warfare

    Published for the Australian Military Forces by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1944. Full of sketches, poems, colour plates and photographs, cartoons and jokes, as well as those fabulous yarns that Aussies can tell so well, and all by the service personnel who were engaged in the South West Pacific during World War II.  Contributors are identified only by their service numbers...so your grandfather or great grandfather may be among the authors.  Here we do not find battle statistics, plans or  generals - just the down to earth Australian Diggers.

  • Atlantic Meeting
    An account of Churchill's voyage in August 1941 on the Prince of Wales and his meeting with President Roosevelt, the outcome of which was the Atlantic Charter.
  • patton

    Patton's aggression and theatrical personality made his units the most successful and efficient and he believed that it should be his Army that should lead the Allied attacks.  This brought him into constant conflict with Eisenhower and Montgomery, with Patton doing nothing to hide his belief that he would win the war if properly supported. He expected the same aggression from his men and was probably the best American field commander in the European theatre.

  • Great Military Disasters

    Military history has plenty of successful campaigns by celebrated commanders.  But what of the wartime tragedies of incompetence, miscalculation and misfortune that have dishonoured the names of once-proud generals, wasted the lives of thousands of soldiers and resulted in loss of precious territory and power?  This book covers twenty encounters, including the bloody Battle of Bannockburn in 1614, Napoleon's humiliation in Moscow in 1812 and Custer's shocking defeat at Little Bighorn in 1876.  Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • ruin from the air
    The complete story of the Atomic Bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima, based on interviews, diaries, government documents and a wealth of published and never-before published material and also the first account of the bomb was very nearly not used.  Very detailed and in depth.
  • North African war
    Churchill said that the North African War was the hinge of fate.   This book is a vivid description of the entire campaign:  three years, thousands of miles, over a millions Allied and Axis troops and thousands of ships, tanks and aircraft.
  • Active Service

    With Australia in the Middle East. Published for the Military History and Information Section, A.I.F. (Middle East) by the Board of Management of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1941.  This volume covers all manner of events and chapter headings include: 'Furphy-Flushers' of Tobruk; There's Always An American; With Hills Like Home; "Little Syd";  Ernie was a Cook; Guests of the Beduin and much much more, all told by our Diggers in true Aussie style. There's also cartoons, poems, colour plates, black and white photographs and  talented sketches.  See the war through the eyes of the men and women who were there.

  • nancy wake
    In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.
  • HMAS Mk III

    Published for the Royal Australian Navy buy the Australian War Memorial, Canberra in 1944. A book chockful of fabulous artwork, sketches, photographs, poems, writings and memoirs of the serving personnel of the Royal Australian Navy and their service in World War II - the men who were there as it all happened.  A must for any real war buff.  Illustrated in black and white and colour.

  • World At War

    World War II, the most massive and appalling military conflagration in history began on September 1, 1939 when Hitler's troops invaded Poland and from there, it spread inexorably in all directions. On December 7 1941, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbour, thus bringing the huge American armies into the picture and the Pacific was ablaze as Japan and America fought a devastating island-hopping war across the ocean. As well as swallowing millions of lives, the demands of the military machine gave rise to the atom bomb and the computer; the British Empire was dying but the Commonwealth was heralded; the war made Churchill and  the 'spiv'; it created rationing and the Welfare State; it slaughtered 6,000,000 Jews, broke marriages and laid waste to the European economy.  This is a graphic account of the fateful years that changed the world forever. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • munda trail
  • Behind BambooBehind Bamboo Page

    Rivett was a journalist, who in 1942 volunteered to work for the Malayan Broadcasting Commission which had been set up in Singapore to counter Japanese propaganda.  On 9 February 1942 he broadcast the news that Japan had invaded the island, then escaped Singapore. The refugee ship was bombed, but he was one of those who survived. However, after several weeks of evasion, around 4 March 1942 he was captured by the Japanese on  Java and sent to work on the infamous Burma Railway.  Here he vividly describes his experiences and those of the men imprisoned with him. His story is told starkly, with illustrations of the prisoner hell-ships and Japanese torture of the prisoners.

  • Word From John

    An Australian soldier's letters to his friends from World War II. When written, these letters did not mention place names other than those permitted by the censor.  In order to make a continuous and intelligible narrative, these place names (now permitted) have been inserted. A rare glimpse from the war front.

  • 013

    It was at Dunkirk that Toosey's charisma and fortitude were first noted and in 1941 he was given command of an artillery regiment. Sent to fight in the Far East he and his men were embroiled in the battle for Singapore and were taken prisoner after the island's fall in 1942. The Japanese, scornful of the Allied forces for surrendering, determined to make use of the new workforce now at their disposal. Toosey was sent to Thailand to command the 'bridge camp' at Tamarkan  where he was ordered to supervise the construction of two railway bridges over the river Khwae Mae Khlong. Starvation rations and harsh working conditions mean that dysentery and cholera were rife and a quarter of the 60,000 prisoners working on the Burma Railway wold perish.  Toosey insisted on high standards of hygiene and discipline, giving back the men their self-respect and making himself a buffer for the cruel excesses if the guards.  The author is Toosey's grand-daughter. Illustrated with black and white photographs and sketches.

  • orbis military yearbook 1987
  • rommel

    Rommel distinguished himself during World War I and at the start of World War II he was called upon to lead the 7th Panzer division.  His successful drive across France was rewarded by promotion and the command of German troops in Libya. He was made Field Marshal after the fall of Tobruk but  he was hampered by lack of supplies at El Alamein and his health problems forced his return to Germany where he was put in charge  of the defence of the Atlantic Wall.  His warnings to Hitler of impending invasion went unheeded and he joined the abortive attempt to assassinate Hitler.  He was forced to suicide for his role and since then, his legend has grown with every passing year. Illustrated with colour and black and white photographs.

  • untold story
    Hackett's first book, The Third World War: August 1985 sold 3,000,000 copies world wide and received great critical acclaim.  This new book tells the rest of the story, using much new material, including declassified NATO reports and many hitherto unexplored episodes.  It gives the inside story of how the war was planned in Moscow and experienced on the battlefield by the Warsaw Pact forces.
  • Great Anzac Stories

    The experiences of soldiers becomes the stuff of legends as the years pass; tales of great bravery, battlefield wins, tragic losses and poignant moments.  Here we relive the horror of the first day on Gallipoli, admire the courage of the men who fought at Fromelles, the Rats of Tobruk, the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels and the secret submariners. We remember the nurses working in impossible conditions, support home front efforts, experience larrikin episodes and grim jokes - and the  eyewitness accounts that have charted the growth of the ANZAC tradition over the decades.

  • war that hitler won
    What possessed the German people to embrace Hitler and his politics of mass murder? The author, an eminent historian, points to Goebbels' brilliant manipulation of the mass murderer as the key to the Fuhrer's success.  Goebbels' diabolical propaganda machine exploited all communication:  radio, posters, magazines, documentaries, brochures and spectacular films in the drive to capture the minds of millions. By the use of patriotic myth and tradition, a nation fell under a mass hypnosis on a scale never before paralleled.  Illustrated with black and white photos.
  • iven g mackay citizen and soldier

    From The Bulletin July 1, 1951:  "On August 6, 1915, a young major led the men of his 4th Battalion, A.I.F., into one of the most outstanding incidents in the history of the attack on Lone Pine, on Gallipoli. A fine, flashing figure of an athlete, dark and lithe, he raced across the ground towards a Turkish sap near Owen's Gully.  He carried a rifle with a bayonet like the rest of his party and fired from the hip as he went..."  So begins the legend of Iven G. Mackay, who never wavered in the high ideals he embraced as a young man, and who inspired countless numbers of Australians over two World Wars.

  • stoker

    In 1987 the Australian Government finally agreed to compensate Australian personnel who had been interned and subjected to brutal treatment in Nazi concentration camps.  A.I.F soldier Don Watt was one of those internees. Like many in the camps, Watt  thought of escape. After several short periods pf freedom he managed to stay on the run for three weeks, only to be recaptured within sight of the Swiss border. Brutal  torture by the Nazis failed to make Watt disclose details of his escape. His punishment was consignment to Auschwitz - where he was given a horrific choice.  It took fifty years for Watt to come to terms  with his experiences - an ordeal that he never mentioned to anyone, not even his immediate family - and reveal the full story. In spite of the horrors he witnessed and those in which he was forced to participate, he remained modest, straightforward, understated, courageous and laconic - a hero in the tradition of the true Australian Digger.