Militaria

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  • World War One In Postcards
    The extraordinary phenomenon of the war postcard  - reflections of the full range of responses to the most murderous and ghastly of all wars.  The chapters herein include: story postcards, military subjects, heroism and agony, religious themes, humour, animal and field postcards - even those embroidered with silk and very beautiful still today.  Even propaganda is represented.   Almost three hundred post cards are reproduced - individual historic documents of a bygone age.  Photos in colour and black and white.
  • Word From John

    An Australian soldier's letters to his friends from World War II. When written, these letters did not mention place names other than those permitted by the censor.  In order to make a continuous and intelligible narrative, these place names (now permitted) have been inserted. A rare glimpse from the war front.

  • woodfill of the regulars
    Described as the biography of a common soldier with thirty three years of service in the American Army, this 'uncommon' soldier distinguished himself in the Argonne in World War I and several other conflicts.  Samuel Woodfill was regarded as being a true American frontiersman who seems to have had many and varied adventures, given such chapter headings as: I Was Born with a  Gun in My Hands;  A Surprise Attack and Escape Over A Precipice; Out of Company C Only Four Men Survived; The Tragedy of A Medicine Man; The Strange End of Sam Gowler and many others just as intriguing.  Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • weimar and the rise of hitler
  • We Were There

    This book captures the memories of 3,700 Australian men who served in World War II. Ageing men in the 1980s, they filled in long and searching questionnaires, encouraged to look back, think back, search back to the days when they were young and growing up in a world that , still retarded by economic depression, was nevertheless lurching toward a global conflict. Here are their boyhoods, their reasons for joining up, their reactions to army life and the consequences of their service. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • vietnam
    This Australian analysis was the fourth in a series of background books sponsored by the Australian Institute of International Affairs.  This book dispassionately consider the much-discussed factual and legal consequences of the 1954 international agreements with an appraisal of the circumstances of Australian and American intervention as well as the arguments for and against involvement.
  • Toward World War III
    The author is a Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Research on Globalisation. This book has been rated and reviewed as a "...'must' resource - a richly documented and systematic diagnosis of the...planning of U.S. Wars since 9-11" "...one of the most important books currently available...the information is heart rending, scary and absolutely accurate." ...a hard-hitting and compelling book (which) explains why and how we must undertake  a concerted...campaign to head off the impending  cataclysmic demise of the human race and planet Earth."
  • World At War

    World War II, the most massive and appalling military conflagration in history began on September 1, 1939 when Hitler's troops invaded Poland and from there, it spread inexorably in all directions. On December 7 1941, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbour, thus bringing the huge American armies into the picture and the Pacific was ablaze as Japan and America fought a devastating island-hopping war across the ocean. As well as swallowing millions of lives, the demands of the military machine gave rise to the atom bomb and the computer; the British Empire was dying but the Commonwealth was heralded; the war made Churchill and  the 'spiv'; it created rationing and the Welfare State; it slaughtered 6,000,000 Jews, broke marriages and laid waste to the European economy.  This is a graphic account of the fateful years that changed the world forever. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • war that hitler won
    What possessed the German people to embrace Hitler and his politics of mass murder? The author, an eminent historian, points to Goebbels' brilliant manipulation of the mass murderer as the key to the Fuhrer's success.  Goebbels' diabolical propaganda machine exploited all communication:  radio, posters, magazines, documentaries, brochures and spectacular films in the drive to capture the minds of millions. By the use of patriotic myth and tradition, a nation fell under a mass hypnosis on a scale never before paralleled.  Illustrated with black and white photos.
  • war diary
    A treasure trove of wealth to the historian, particularly regarding events in the years 1939 to 1942.
  • untold story
    Hackett's first book, The Third World War: August 1985 sold 3,000,000 copies world wide and received great critical acclaim.  This new book tells the rest of the story, using much new material, including declassified NATO reports and many hitherto unexplored episodes.  It gives the inside story of how the war was planned in Moscow and experienced on the battlefield by the Warsaw Pact forces.
  • secret forces of world war II
    World War II gave rise to an astonishing number of unorthodox 'special forces' yet this is the first book to assess their contribution to the final victory.  They operated under the cloak of secrecy then were quickly disbanded without receiving credit for their achievements.
  • rise and fall of the third reich

     Here for the first time is the complete history of Hitler's empire.  No other empire ever bequeathed to historians such mountains of evidence about its rise and fall as the Third Reich. The Allied demand for unconditional surrender produced - before the Nazis could destroy their files - an almost hour-to-hour record of the nightmare realm created by Hitler. This record includes the testimony of Nazi leaders, concentration camp inmates, the diaries of officials, transcripts of secret conferences, army orders, private letters - all the vast paper work behind a conspiracy to conquer the world. This is also the story of Hitler the man - his love affairs, his imprisonment, his suicide.  There is also details of the plot to kidnap the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and hundreds of other inside stories. Most of all, it is the story of how Hitler destroyed his beloved Germany. The author, who watched and reported on the Nazis since 1925 had been reporting on-the-spot from Germany and Europe for almost forty years and spent over five years sifting the mountains of paper that eventually became this definitive history.

  • pictorial history of land battles
    A book full of information, pictures and maps: The Battle of the Bulge; The Charge of the Light Brigade; Agincourt; Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War and more.
  • orbis military yearbook 1987
  • North African war
    Churchill said that the North African War was the hinge of fate.   This book is a vivid description of the entire campaign:  three years, thousands of miles, over a millions Allied and Axis troops and thousands of ships, tanks and aircraft.
  • Naked Island

    The author has written the full length story of the Malayan campaign of World War II from the 'sharp end' of the fighting and as a prisoner-of-war, one of thousands who suffered for three years. He takes the reader through bewildering, disordered days and nights of fighting to  humiliation at the hands of the Japanese, versed in all the arts of abasing and breaking prisoners by starvation and neglect. The illustrations by fellow prisoner Ronald Searle (St. Trinians, Down With Skool,Whizz For Atomms, How To Be Top, etc.) are poignant, forceful and make reality even more real. This really is war and imprisonment as it happened.

  • The Last Battle

    From the author of The Longest Day. On Monday, April 16, 1945, an artillery barrage announced the opening Russian attack against Berlin. Russian troops were less than thirty-eight miles from Berlins centre. In fourteen days Hitler would be dead. In twenty-one days, the war would be over.  Forty-five miles to the west, advance units of the U.S. Ninth army were angrily and reluctantly turning back. Berlin was no longer a military objective. This book is the story of three weeks in which the city of Berlin - gutted, smouldering, terrorised, yet miraculously still  alive -  was the focal point of millions of lives: the last obstacle of the triumphant Allies, the last defence for the Germans and the last refuge for Hitler. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • holy fox
    The life of Lord Halifax, remembered as the architect of the policy of achievement of Nazi Germany.  His meeting with Hitler in 1937 was a milestone in appeasement yet just days before the 1938 Munich conference, Halifax repudiated the policy and demanded the destruction of Nazism.  By May 1940, it was he rather than Churchill who was the choice for Britain's war leader.  His public life also included Viceroy of India from 1926 - 31 and a deal with Gandhi that ended the Civil Disobedience campaign before it could force the British to quit.
  • hinge factor

    From the Wooden Horse of Troy to the Gulf War, military history has been as much marked by chance and error as gallantry and heroism.  Here is an entertaining observation that shows how many conflicts have been decided by the caprices of weather, bad intelligence or individual incompetence. In military terms, the incident that swings a battle from victory to defeat in a moment is known as the Hinge Factor. Features:  Agincourt, Waterloo, Balaclava, The Bismarck, the Gulf War and many other crucially historic military moments.

  • goebbels diariesgoebbels diaries
    When the Russians overran Berlin in 1945 they went through the German official archives with more vigour than discrimination.  Some material was shipped to Russia, some was destroyed and the rest scattered and trampled.  The pages of Goebbel's diary were found in the ministry courtyard, having narrowly escaped burning.  Seven thousand sheets of unburnt paper was salvaged by an amateur junk dealer, who salvaged the official document binders and made random bundles of the paper.  To get the diary in order was a Herculean task.  Here is not only the diary, but other odd documents of Goebbel's life:  receipts, drafts of speeches, expense accounts, lists of charity donations and letters.
  • 013

    It was at Dunkirk that Toosey's charisma and fortitude were first noted and in 1941 he was given command of an artillery regiment. Sent to fight in the Far East he and his men were embroiled in the battle for Singapore and were taken prisoner after the island's fall in 1942. The Japanese, scornful of the Allied forces for surrendering, determined to make use of the new workforce now at their disposal. Toosey was sent to Thailand to command the 'bridge camp' at Tamarkan  where he was ordered to supervise the construction of two railway bridges over the river Khwae Mae Khlong. Starvation rations and harsh working conditions mean that dysentery and cholera were rife and a quarter of the 60,000 prisoners working on the Burma Railway wold perish.  Toosey insisted on high standards of hygiene and discipline, giving back the men their self-respect and making himself a buffer for the cruel excesses if the guards.  The author is Toosey's grand-daughter. Illustrated with black and white photographs and sketches.

  • 012

    Kokichi Nishimura was a member of the 2nd battalion, 144th regiment of the Japanese Imperial Army. In 1942 he fought every foot of the Kokoda Track as the Japanese attempted to take Port Moresby and was the only man from his platoon to survive the campaign. Finally he retreated, wounded and starving, leaving thousands of his comrades buried in shallow graves along the Track. He promised that he would one day return to them and bring them home to Japan for proper burial. He married, had three children and started an engineering business which prospered. But his driving ambition was to return to New Guinea to keep his promise. In 1979, nearing retirement age, he shocked his family by giving his business to his sons, his house and all his assets to his wife and he returned to New Guinea to begin his search for the remains of Japanese soldiers. For the next 25 years Nishimura lived alone in huts and tents along the Kokoda Track and using a mattock, a shovel, a metal detector and an indomitable will, he found the bones of hundreds of his comrades and also forged a new comradeship and new purpose in helping the poverty-stricken Papuans he worked amongst. An incredible story. Illustrated with black and white photographs.

  • patton

    Patton's aggression and theatrical personality made his units the most successful and efficient and he believed that it should be his Army that should lead the Allied attacks.  This brought him into constant conflict with Eisenhower and Montgomery, with Patton doing nothing to hide his belief that he would win the war if properly supported. He expected the same aggression from his men and was probably the best American field commander in the European theatre.

  • rommel

    Rommel distinguished himself during World War I and at the start of World War II he was called upon to lead the 7th Panzer division.  His successful drive across France was rewarded by promotion and the command of German troops in Libya. He was made Field Marshal after the fall of Tobruk but  he was hampered by lack of supplies at El Alamein and his health problems forced his return to Germany where he was put in charge  of the defence of the Atlantic Wall.  His warnings to Hitler of impending invasion went unheeded and he joined the abortive attempt to assassinate Hitler.  He was forced to suicide for his role and since then, his legend has grown with every passing year. Illustrated with colour and black and white photographs.

  • stoker

    In 1987 the Australian Government finally agreed to compensate Australian personnel who had been interned and subjected to brutal treatment in Nazi concentration camps.  A.I.F soldier Don Watt was one of those internees. Like many in the camps, Watt  thought of escape. After several short periods pf freedom he managed to stay on the run for three weeks, only to be recaptured within sight of the Swiss border. Brutal  torture by the Nazis failed to make Watt disclose details of his escape. His punishment was consignment to Auschwitz - where he was given a horrific choice.  It took fifty years for Watt to come to terms  with his experiences - an ordeal that he never mentioned to anyone, not even his immediate family - and reveal the full story. In spite of the horrors he witnessed and those in which he was forced to participate, he remained modest, straightforward, understated, courageous and laconic - a hero in the tradition of the true Australian Digger.

  • Soldiering On

    The Australian Army at Home and Overseas, by Some of the Boys and published by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1942.  Chapters include: Star Over Bethlehem; Diggers in Britain; Midnight Messiah; Purple's Pup; Arab Justice; Digger v. Doughboy and so much more.  Our boys' impressions of Christmas in a cold climate and local customs as well as the American servicemen and women here in Australia.  The colour plates, interestingly, are pasted in. Tales, jokes, sketches, cartoons and  on-the-spot experiences a-plenty. Illustrated in colour and black and white. A treasure mine of information.