Militaria

//Militaria
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  • message from the falklands
    The life and gallant death of David Tinker, Lieut. R.N. from his letters and poems.
  • Active Service

    With Australia in the Middle East. Published for the Military History and Information Section, A.I.F. (Middle East) by the Board of Management of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1941.  This volume covers all manner of events and chapter headings include: 'Furphy-Flushers' of Tobruk; There's Always An American; With Hills Like Home; "Little Syd";  Ernie was a Cook; Guests of the Beduin and much much more, all told by our Diggers in true Aussie style. There's also cartoons, poems, colour plates, black and white photographs and  talented sketches.  See the war through the eyes of the men and women who were there.

  • air war south atlantic
    Here is the full account of the air actions of the Falklands conflict in 1982. This volume includes first hand accounts from pilots involved in combat and attack mission; details of the movements and intentions of the Argentine fleet, details of the Exocet missile attacks by the Argentine Navy and much more.
  • anzac's story

    Roy Kyle started writing his remarkable story at the age of 89 and almost completed his story before he died.  Bryce Courtenay was asked to edit Roy's work with a view to it being published. Roy was a typical Anzac, fiercely patriotic and prepared to give his life for King and Country.  He couldn't wait to 'have a go' and enlisted at 17.  He then found himself in a trench at Lone Pine on his 18th birthday.  He was one of the last to leave Gallipolli, then serving in Egypt and later at the Somme.  There are literally hundreds of books written by high-ranking officers, historians and military experts on the part played by the Anzacs in the Dardennelles Campaign - but very few by the ordinary soldier.

  • Atlantic Meeting
    An account of Churchill's voyage in August 1941 on the Prince of Wales and his meeting with President Roosevelt, the outcome of which was the Atlantic Charter.
  • Australian And Imperial Defence

    Australia was almost defenceless against Japanese attack in 1942. Here it is suggested that vital lessons for today can be learnt from that period. Did the Australian leaders rely too heavily on Britain and were they let down? How much can Australia rely on any country for support in wartime? From the days of the First Fleet it was always accepted that the United Kingdom would send its fleet to defend Australia. For this reason Australia sent troops overseas as early as 1885 to help fight Imperial wars. The situation changed after 1918 for then Japan became a likely enemy. Could Britain defend Australia from attack and conduct a war in Europe? Dr. McCarthy examines both sides of the question and concludes that it was never possible.

  • by the sword divided
  • collecting military Antiques
    Includes all sorts of advice on how to start a collection; where to find military collectables and what to pay for them.  Loads of colour and black and white photographs.
  • Death In The Rice Fields

    The author, a TV reporter and journalist, has condensed his experiences and observations of the Indo-China battlefields over a thirty-five year period. Sights, sounds and smells come alive in the graphic and vivid recreation by a neutral yet passionately involved eye-witness.  Scholl-Latour first traveled to South-East Asia on a troop-ship in 1945 and since then has covered three wars: the war against French colonialism, the American involvement in Vietnam and the final devastation of Kampuchea. He sees those years as a tragedy that has shattered every illusion of freedom as the French, the Americans and the Khmer Rouge each tried to impose their versions of freedom by force.