Militaria

//Militaria
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  • Great Military Disasters

    Military history has plenty of successful campaigns by celebrated commanders.  But what of the wartime tragedies of incompetence, miscalculation and misfortune that have dishonoured the names of once-proud generals, wasted the lives of thousands of soldiers and resulted in loss of precious territory and power?  This book covers twenty encounters, including the bloody Battle of Bannockburn in 1614, Napoleon's humiliation in Moscow in 1812 and Custer's shocking defeat at Little Bighorn in 1876.  Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • HMAS Mk III

    Published for the Royal Australian Navy buy the Australian War Memorial, Canberra in 1944. A book chockful of fabulous artwork, sketches, photographs, poems, writings and memoirs of the serving personnel of the Royal Australian Navy and their service in World War II - the men who were there as it all happened.  A must for any real war buff.  Illustrated in black and white and colour.

  • Jungle Warfare

    Published for the Australian Military Forces by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1944. Full of sketches, poems, colour plates and photographs, cartoons and jokes, as well as those fabulous yarns that Aussies can tell so well, and all by the service personnel who were engaged in the South West Pacific during World War II.  Contributors are identified only by their service numbers...so your grandfather or great grandfather may be among the authors.  Here we do not find battle statistics, plans or  generals - just the down to earth Australian Diggers.

  • Soldiering On

    The Australian Army at Home and Overseas, by Some of the Boys and published by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1942.  Chapters include: Star Over Bethlehem; Diggers in Britain; Midnight Messiah; Purple's Pup; Arab Justice; Digger v. Doughboy and so much more.  Our boys' impressions of Christmas in a cold climate and local customs as well as the American servicemen and women here in Australia.  The colour plates, interestingly, are pasted in. Tales, jokes, sketches, cartoons and  on-the-spot experiences a-plenty. Illustrated in colour and black and white. A treasure mine of information.

  • Active Service

    With Australia in the Middle East. Published for the Military History and Information Section, A.I.F. (Middle East) by the Board of Management of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1941.  This volume covers all manner of events and chapter headings include: 'Furphy-Flushers' of Tobruk; There's Always An American; With Hills Like Home; "Little Syd";  Ernie was a Cook; Guests of the Beduin and much much more, all told by our Diggers in true Aussie style. There's also cartoons, poems, colour plates, black and white photographs and  talented sketches.  See the war through the eyes of the men and women who were there.

  • The Last Battle

    From the author of The Longest Day. On Monday, April 16, 1945, an artillery barrage announced the opening Russian attack against Berlin. Russian troops were less than thirty-eight miles from Berlins centre. In fourteen days Hitler would be dead. In twenty-one days, the war would be over.  Forty-five miles to the west, advance units of the U.S. Ninth army were angrily and reluctantly turning back. Berlin was no longer a military objective. This book is the story of three weeks in which the city of Berlin - gutted, smouldering, terrorised, yet miraculously still  alive -  was the focal point of millions of lives: the last obstacle of the triumphant Allies, the last defence for the Germans and the last refuge for Hitler. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • SOE 1940 46

    S.O.E. was a small, tough British secret service dirty-tricks department.  Its job was to support and stimulate resistance in occupied countries. It was wound up after the war.  Its total strength was never more than 10,000 men and 3,200 women, over a third of them secret agents - it exercised vast influence on the war all over the world. This is a readable volume on how S.O.E was created and run, the calibre of the men and women involved, what tools they used and how, when and where they used them, where they did well - and where they did badly. Illustrated with black and white photographs.

  • Great Anzac Stories

    The experiences of soldiers becomes the stuff of legends as the years pass; tales of great bravery, battlefield wins, tragic losses and poignant moments.  Here we relive the horror of the first day on Gallipoli, admire the courage of the men who fought at Fromelles, the Rats of Tobruk, the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels and the secret submariners. We remember the nurses working in impossible conditions, support home front efforts, experience larrikin episodes and grim jokes - and the  eyewitness accounts that have charted the growth of the ANZAC tradition over the decades.

  • Death In The Rice Fields

    The author, a TV reporter and journalist, has condensed his experiences and observations of the Indo-China battlefields over a thirty-five year period. Sights, sounds and smells come alive in the graphic and vivid recreation by a neutral yet passionately involved eye-witness.  Scholl-Latour first traveled to South-East Asia on a troop-ship in 1945 and since then has covered three wars: the war against French colonialism, the American involvement in Vietnam and the final devastation of Kampuchea. He sees those years as a tragedy that has shattered every illusion of freedom as the French, the Americans and the Khmer Rouge each tried to impose their versions of freedom by force.