In this self-portrait, told in the first person, is the life of Francois Villon, the vagabond medieval poet. He was brought up by Father Guillame Villon, the kind scholarly priest who noticed the gifts of this sharp-witted waif, and adopted him, giving him his name for immortality. This is Villon’s life from its earliest beginnings: as a gutter urchin in turbulent medieval Paris; as a student of the Sorbonne and a leader in the endless feuds between Gown and Town; as a courtier of Prince Charles of OrlĂ©ans; and as a prisoner in a dungeon with all the attendant tortures of the Middle Ages. As a burglar, whore-monger and through-going rogue, he twice escaped the gallows as he wandered through France as a fugitive from the law. But throughout all his wildest dissipations and vicissitudes and the long procession of his lights o’ love, only one kept his heart. Katherine de Vaucelle – or Marthe Rose. Who was she, this Marthe Rose, whose name appears in acrostic in his most famous ballades? It’s possible that this riddle has now been solved…