On 17 April 1935, a fisherman hooked a small shark off Coogee Beach, Sydney. Then, a four-metre tiger shark swallowed the smaller shark, allowing it to be caught too. But instead of dumping his catch, the fisherman took the larger shark – still alive – to the nearby Coogee Aquarium Baths, where it would make a wonderful attraction for the following Anzac Day weekend. At that time in Sydney, the shark was ‘public enemy number one’, since in late February and early March, three young men had been taken by sharks at New South Wales beaches. Bounty hunters were employed to help rid Sydney’s beaches of the menace, so crowds now flocked to see this monster with man-eating capabilities, which was given the run of the pool. For several days the shark seemed quite active and had a voracious appetite, but on 25 April, Anzac Day, it began acting strangely: it appeared ill, moved slowly and was seemingly disoriented. Then suddenly there was a great commotion in the pool, and while spectators watched, the shark vomited up a tattoed, human arm. At first, another tragic accident was presumed, but a medical examination of the arm revealed it had not been bitten off by the shark – but had been removed from its body with a knife or other sharp instrument, and not in a surgical procedure. The focus of the investigation turned to murder – the arm was identified as that of Jim Smith: a bankrupt builder, a former SP bookmaker and boxer and a small-time criminal with a record of minor convictions, who had drifted onto the edges of the underworld and became involved in the illegal gambling that was rife throughout Sydney at that time. But Smith had also been a ‘fizzer’ – a police informer with connections to a seemingly respectable businessman, Reginald Lloyd Holmes – who was not quite as respectable as he seemed…  This history contains revelations made to the author by Patrick Brady, one of the chief suspects in the case.