Author Autographed

//Author Autographed
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  • "If people turn to look at you in the street, you are not well dressed, but either too stiff, too tight, or too fashionable." So said Beau Brummell, the first metrosexual, 200 years before the word was even invented. His name has become synonymous with wit, profligacy, fine tailoring, and fashion. A style pundit, Brummell was responsible for changing forever the way men dress - inventing, in effect, the suit. He cut a dramatic swath through British society, from his early years as a favorite of the Prince of Wales and an arbiter of taste in the Age of Elegance, to his precipitous fall into poverty, incarceration, and madness, creating the blueprint for celebrity crash and burn, falling dramatically out of favor and spending his last years in a hellish asylum. But for nearly two decades, Brummell ruled over the tastes and pursuits of the well heeled and influential - deemed more important than Napoleon and the inspiration for Byron's Don Juan. Through love letters, historical records, and poems, Ian Kelly reveals the man inside the suit, unlocking the scandalous behavior of London's high society while illuminating Brummell's enigmatic life in the colorful, tumultuous West End. A rare rendering of an era filled with excess, scandal, promiscuity, opulence, and luxury, 'Beau Brummell' is the first comprehensive view of an elegant and ultimately tragic figure whose influence continues to this day.
  • Edward Francis "Eddie" Charlton,  AM (31 October 1929 – 8 November 2004) was an Australian professional snooker and English billiards player. He won the Australian Professional Championship numerous times, was the Pot Black Champion three times and winner of the Kronenbrau 1308 Classic and the Limosin International. He will be remembered fondly by Australians  as 'Steady Eddie' and his appearances on the BBC-TV programme Pot Black.      
  • The part played by over 24,000 women in the Australian Army in World War II is largely unknown - until now. Here is recorded their involvement in the Cowra massacre, poisonous gas experiments, intelligence services and other ground breaking areas. Taken from first-hand revealing experiences, photos and documents.
  • In the landscape of Northern Queensland, these stories are narrated by Leverton, who calls himself a people-freak - fascinated by the hordes of misfits and drop-outs coming from the south.  There is The Fixer, who lives by himself with his verse-making and heart-break;  Willy Fourcorners, the elderly Aboriginal; the elegant Father Rassini and Sadie, who had failed in love and was forced to humility. Witty and outrageously comedic, yet the stories are touching with the sadness of self-delusion.
  • Jaxie Clackton dreads going home.  His mum's dead, his old man bashes him mercilessly and he wishes he was an orphan. Then in one terrible moment his life is stripped to what he can carry and ow he can keep himself alive.  There's just one person in the world who would understand hi  and what he still dares to dream for. But to reach her he has to cross the vast saltlands on a trek that only a dreamer or a fugitive would dare to attempt.
  • Armed robbery, murder, lies, treachery, 'confession' and legal tangle that ended in a sensational trial, followed by three executions - all the ingredients of a callous crime committed on the New Zealand goldfields in 1866. A gang of brutal Londoners - Richard Burgess, Tom Noon (Noonan), Joseph Sullivan and Phil Levy waylaid five gold-laden prospectors on a lonely track on Maungatapu ('Sacred Mountain'), killed them and hid the bodies before going on a spree. The prospectors were missed, and suspicion fell on the four. Hoping for a free pardon, Sullivan 'dobbed' on his mates and Burgess wrote a confession but implicated Sullivan. Clune traces the lives of the four and shows the influences played such an important role in shaping their twisted lives - the overcrowded Thames-side slums created by the Industrial Revolution, the laws that punished rather than reformed, the rotting prison hulks, the transportation system and the mental cruelty in the prisons of the day.
  • Cohen came to international attention when he was photographed hanging onto the bow of a US nuclear-armed warship in Sydney Harbour in protest against the nuclear arms race.  Cohen, the first Green member of the N.S.W Parliament, looks back over sixteen years of radical environmentalism. Cohen tells it as it was on the ground, at protests such as the 1982 Nightcap Forest campaign, the Franklin River blockade, Roxby Downs uranium mine protests, Daintree, the Chaelundi old growth forest campaign in northern NSW and the campaign to end French nuclear testing in the South Pacific. Here is a gripping, powerful and insightful account of the Australian environmental protest movement, a moment which has transformed Australian politics. Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • Hollywood hunk and swash-buckler Stewart Granger tells of his leap to stardom in The Man In Grey and his overnight Hollywood success in King Solomon's Mines. He battled studio bosses, including Howard Hughes, experienced near-fatal accidents in film stunts that he always insisted on doing himself and had very close encounters with wild animals while filming in Africa and India - not to mention the temptation of being thrown together with some of the most beautiful women in the world.  This iconic actor tells his story his way -with frankness, modesty and homeliness.   Known for heroic sword fighting-roles such as The Prisoner of Zenda and Beau Brummell, Granger says: "I always thought I was big until I played opposite John Wayne in North to Alaska!"
  • Jamal and Bibi have a dream - to lead Australia to soccer glory in the next World Cup. But first they must face landmines, pirates, storms and assassins. Can Jamal and his family survive their incredible journey and get to Australia? Sometimes - to save the people you love - you just have to go overboard.