Author Autographed

//Author Autographed
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  • Older than the Melbourne Cup, the Derby is restricted to three year olds and run at set weights.  Here is the history of the Derby, with a roll call of famous horses, both winners and also-rans and the effect that this race has had on so many careers. With black and white photographs.
  • An extremely rare copy of a limited edition book that has been devalued by the uploading of a PDF version to the Internet.  Frederic Slaney Poole stepped off the St. Vincent at Port Adelaide on November 30, 1867. His descendant has told his incredible story of his life from his role as a horseback priest to becoming Canon.
  • Edward Francis "Eddie" Charlton,  AM (31 October 1929 – 8 November 2004) was an Australian professional snooker and English billiards player. He won the Australian Professional Championship numerous times, was the Pot Black Champion three times and winner of the Kronenbrau 1308 Classic and the Limosin International. He will be remembered fondly by Australians  as 'Steady Eddie' and his appearances on the BBC-TV programme Pot Black.      
  • A very well written trilogy of which this book is the third and last, concerning Alfred, an elven cleric and the persecution of those who are different by the the narrow minded fanatic Hounds of God. Cover art by Kevin Eugene Johnson
  • The story of Robert Six - ex-sailor, ex-truck driver and ex-pilot - the man behind one of America's more dramatic success stories.  Six's career began in the pioneering days of aviation and continued into the age of jet and supersonic transport.  A lively view of the history of commercial airlines in America, full of anecdotes and regarded as entertaining.
  • Galway, universally recognised as the man with the golden flute, recounts his life that began in the back streets of Belfast, where 'everybody played an instrument and if they couldn't afford one, they sang'. For six years he was principal flautist with the Berlin Philharmonic under Herbert von Karajan and he also played with the London Symphony orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic. His subsequent solo concerts and recordings have established him as a virtuoso with a superb technique. He began playing the mouth organ, then the violin and then the flute - a complete individualist, of whom von Karajan said, "Talking to Jimmy Galway is like talking to a man from Mars!"
  • Armed robbery, murder, lies, treachery, 'confession' and legal tangle that ended in a sensational trial, followed by three executions - all the ingredients of a callous crime committed on the New Zealand goldfields in 1866. A gang of brutal Londoners - Richard Burgess, Tom Noon (Noonan), Joseph Sullivan and Phil Levy waylaid five gold-laden prospectors on a lonely track on Maungatapu ('Sacred Mountain'), killed them and hid the bodies before going on a spree. The prospectors were missed, and suspicion fell on the four. Hoping for a free pardon, Sullivan 'dobbed' on his mates and Burgess wrote a confession but implicated Sullivan. Clune traces the lives of the four and shows the influences played such an important role in shaping their twisted lives - the overcrowded Thames-side slums created by the Industrial Revolution, the laws that punished rather than reformed, the rotting prison hulks, the transportation system and the mental cruelty in the prisons of the day.
  • The part played by over 24,000 women in the Australian Army in World War II is largely unknown - until now. Here is recorded their involvement in the Cowra massacre, poisonous gas experiments, intelligence services and other ground breaking areas. Taken from first-hand revealing experiences, photos and documents.
  • Stockton served overseas for three years with the RAAF and during this time completed his degree by correspondence.  He has taught at Narrandera and Wauchope High Schools and was Deputy Principal at Cowra and Springwood High Schools.  In 1976 he also became the first principal at the new high school at Cambridge Park and saw it grow from an initial enrolment of 246 students to be the third largest secondary school in the Sydney area.  In his story he experiences the discomforts and frustrations as well as the funny side of teaching and the adventure of such a career. This book is from a limited printing of only 1000.
  • "If people turn to look at you in the street, you are not well dressed, but either too stiff, too tight, or too fashionable." So said Beau Brummell, the first metrosexual, 200 years before the word was even invented. His name has become synonymous with wit, profligacy, fine tailoring, and fashion. A style pundit, Brummell was responsible for changing forever the way men dress - inventing, in effect, the suit. He cut a dramatic swath through British society, from his early years as a favorite of the Prince of Wales and an arbiter of taste in the Age of Elegance, to his precipitous fall into poverty, incarceration, and madness, creating the blueprint for celebrity crash and burn, falling dramatically out of favor and spending his last years in a hellish asylum. But for nearly two decades, Brummell ruled over the tastes and pursuits of the well heeled and influential - deemed more important than Napoleon and the inspiration for Byron's Don Juan. Through love letters, historical records, and poems, Ian Kelly reveals the man inside the suit, unlocking the scandalous behavior of London's high society while illuminating Brummell's enigmatic life in the colorful, tumultuous West End. A rare rendering of an era filled with excess, scandal, promiscuity, opulence, and luxury, 'Beau Brummell' is the first comprehensive view of an elegant and ultimately tragic figure whose influence continues to this day.
  • Nevare Burvelle, second son of a new-made lord, is getting ready to enter the Cavalla Academy, serve on the frontier and then on to an advantageous marriage.  At the Academy he will encounter prejudice from the old aristocracy as well as injustice, discrimination and foul play in a hostile and competitive  environment.  His world view will be challenged by his unconventional girl-cousin Epiny and by bizarre dreams which come to him at night. He will learn about the Speck people - dapple-skinned forest dwellers, who worship trees and retain the last traces of magic in the progressive and technologised world. Sexual congress with Specks is regarded  as filthy - they harbour disease. And then, on Dark Night, the carnival comes to Old Thares, bringing with it the first Specks Nevare has ever seen.
  • Cohen came to international attention when he was photographed hanging onto the bow of a US nuclear-armed warship in Sydney Harbour in protest against the nuclear arms race.  Cohen, the first Green member of the N.S.W Parliament, looks back over sixteen years of radical environmentalism. Cohen tells it as it was on the ground, at protests such as the 1982 Nightcap Forest campaign, the Franklin River blockade, Roxby Downs uranium mine protests, Daintree, the Chaelundi old growth forest campaign in northern NSW and the campaign to end French nuclear testing in the South Pacific. Here is a gripping, powerful and insightful account of the Australian environmental protest movement, a moment which has transformed Australian politics. Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • In the landscape of Northern Queensland, these stories are narrated by Leverton, who calls himself a people-freak - fascinated by the hordes of misfits and drop-outs coming from the south.  There is The Fixer, who lives by himself with his verse-making and heart-break;  Willy Fourcorners, the elderly Aboriginal; the elegant Father Rassini and Sadie, who had failed in love and was forced to humility. Witty and outrageously comedic, yet the stories are touching with the sadness of self-delusion.
  • Jamal and Bibi have a dream - to lead Australia to soccer glory in the next World Cup. But first they must face landmines, pirates, storms and assassins. Can Jamal and his family survive their incredible journey and get to Australia? Sometimes - to save the people you love - you just have to go overboard.
  • Martin Fartingale hates English weather, hates Cornwall and most of all, hates his name. He is staying with his mother and batty grandmother in a small fishing village over looking St. Cecils Mount, an intriguing rocky blob at the end of a causeway out to sea. Ignoring the warnings of  his new school friends Danny and Charlotte (Charlie) that no-one has ever escaped from St. Cecils Mount, Mart5in decides to break into the ancient building and explore. He finds himself face to face with Gregor, the Mad Monk, Ursula, a black witch - and he must defeat Sir Bullimore Fergus in sword fighting and the Black Knight in a joust, with unexpected allies the ghost of Uncle Septimus Fartingale (who appears as a foul-smelling green vapour) and a white witch who looks remarkably like Charlie.
  • May, born in 1938, had a sad yet all-too-typical life of poverty, evacuation, foster-homes and dead-end factory jobs.  But she tells her story with sharp wit, refusing to be a victim.  While working as a night-cleaner, she became increasingly militant at the exploitation of  she saw around her.  When she attempted to organise her fellow-cleaners into a union she was blacklisted by big cleaning contractors.  Yet she forged ahead to form the now-famous Cleaners Action Group.
  • Hollywood hunk and swash-buckler Stewart Granger tells of his leap to stardom in The Man In Grey and his overnight Hollywood success in King Solomon's Mines. He battled studio bosses, including Howard Hughes, experienced near-fatal accidents in film stunts that he always insisted on doing himself and had very close encounters with wild animals while filming in Africa and India - not to mention the temptation of being thrown together with some of the most beautiful women in the world.  This iconic actor tells his story his way -with frankness, modesty and homeliness.   Known for heroic sword fighting-roles such as The Prisoner of Zenda and Beau Brummell, Granger says: "I always thought I was big until I played opposite John Wayne in North to Alaska!"
  • A Public Service conspiracy...a major cover-up...and the failure of democratic safeguards.  This book, published in 1989,  was described as 'too hot for the media' yet was recommended by Labour MPs Dr Ian Alexander and George Gear; Liberal MPs Barrie MacKinnon and Bill Grieg; Democrat Jean Jenkins; Independent Hon. Ian Thompson and historian Dame Mary Durack.  The author served sixteen months of a three year prison term an a charge of attempting to mislead the Commonwealth Export Grants Board.  He maintained until his death that he had been framed. This copy is autographed by the author and comes with the original book launch review and a signed letter from the author to the Hon. Jim McLelland dated 9 December 1990.  This book had a limited run of 200 in hardback and 1000 in paperback.