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  • Book IV of The Great South Land Saga. The beautiful valley was lonely and remote and lovely Tilly Martin longed to leave it. Only the presence of Everitt Oliver, his flattering words and dark good looks, eased her restless heart. And she intended to have him - on her own terms. But another woman, as wild and untamed as the land, passionately longed for him too. Before their destinies were decided, the valley would know murder, madness, and disgrace...a young girl born to ill-repute would get a new chance at life...and a proud settler would be humbled by the man he despised.
  • Explosive and controversial, Waterfront exposes, for the first time, the real story behind the bitter 1998 war on the wharves which divided Australians and changed the nature of the workplace forever. This shocking exposè reveals who was behind it and what it means for all Australians. It all began with a 'deep throat' phone call to John Coombs, the head of Australia's most militant union, the Maritime Union of Australia. The mystery caller warned him of a clandestine plot to destroy the union's hold on the waterfront. The controversial stand-off between the Patrick Stevedoring company and the Maritime Union became a battle for the hearts and minds of the average Australian. Veteran Sydney Morning Herald journalists Trinca and Davies covered the waterfront dispute from the very beginning and take us behind the headlines to tell the real story of this real-life political thriller. Illustrated with black and white photographs. A very scarce, autographed first printing;  a derogatory reference to Peter Costello caused this issue to be recalled and pulped.
  • Australian actor and comedian Slim DeGrey (1918 - 2007), known for his roles in They're A Weird Mob, You Can't See Around Corners and many other Australian film and T.V. productions was a member of the A.I.F. Prisoners' Concert Party in the infamous Changi Gaol. There was a funny side; not often and not always, but hilarious and absurd incidents did occur and together with the infamous style of Australian dry humour, helped sustain morale and relieve the drab lives of the P.O.Ws. Littered with fabulous Australianisms and droll sketches, Slim DeGrey definitely found Changi's funny side.
  • Martin Fartingale hates English weather, hates Cornwall and most of all, hates his name. He is staying with his mother and batty grandmother in a small fishing village over looking St. Cecils Mount, an intriguing rocky blob at the end of a causeway out to sea. Ignoring the warnings of  his new school friends Danny and Charlotte (Charlie) that no-one has ever escaped from St. Cecils Mount, Mart5in decides to break into the ancient building and explore. He finds himself face to face with Gregor, the Mad Monk, Ursula, a black witch - and he must defeat Sir Bullimore Fergus in sword fighting and the Black Knight in a joust, with unexpected allies the ghost of Uncle Septimus Fartingale (who appears as a foul-smelling green vapour) and a white witch who looks remarkably like Charlie.
  • Book I of I.Q.: The Trilogy. In a future world,m where people can buy and sell I.Q.,two men set out on a quest to find out who they really are. This is the story of a 100, who never gambled; a 160 who has been reformatted and a I.Q. 1000 president who controls their world.
  • A chance encounter in a fish-’n’-chip shop set Brendan James Murray on the trail of a mystery. Had a gay man been secretly murdered on H.M.A.S Australia during the Second World War? The veteran he spoke to was certain. ‘I knew about it,’ he said. ‘We all did.’ But was the story true? If so, who was the dead man? And why was it so hard to find out? This book is the search for the answer, almost stone-walled by cover-up and silence. In the end, it brings us to the lies that have shrouded our understanding of war, and especially of war at sea. As one of the survivors poignantly says, ‘I want to pass it on to the next generation. What it was like. What it was really like.’
  • So, anyway...how did a tall, shy youth from Weston-super-Mare become a self-confessed legend? These things happen. And en route, John Cleese describes his nerve-racking first public appearance at St Peter’s Preparatory School at the age of eight and five-sixths; his endlessly peripatetic home life with parents who seemed incapable of staying in any house for longer than six months; his first experiences in the world of work as a teacher who knew nothing about the subjects he was expected to teach; his hamster-owning days at Cambridge; and his first encounter with the man who would be his writing partner for over two decades, Graham Chapman. And so on to his dizzying ascent via scriptwriting for Peter Sellers, David Frost, Marty Feldman and others to the heights of Monty Python. Punctuated from time to time with John Cleese’s thoughts on topics as diverse as the nature of comedy, the relative merits of cricket and waterskiing, and the importance of knowing the dates of all the kings and queens of England, this is a masterly performance by a former schoolmaster.  With fabulous black and white photographs.
  • For 2000 years, since it pierced the side of Christ, the Spear of Destiny has been invested with amazing occult power. This is the legend and its continuing fulfillment through the decline of the Roman Empire, the Dark Ages and into the twentieth century. It tells the story of the chain of men who possessed the Spear, from Herod the Great to Adolf Hitler and how they sought to change the face of history by wielding its occult powers for good or evil. The Spear of Destiny is identified as the Spear of the Holy Grail mentioned in the sagas of the Dark Ages and shows the Grail to be a uniquely Western path to mind expansion. For the first time the Satanic occult development and faculties of Adolf Hitler are described in authentic and documented detail,   demonstrating how he furthered his aims and his conquest of the world by black magic practices. The final chapters describe a Manichean battle of worlds behind the changing scene of modern times.  With black and white photographs.
  • Best known for his unforgettable roles on Monty Python - from the Flying Circus to The Meaning of Life. Now, Eric Idle reflects on the meaning of his own life in this entertaining memoir that takes us on an unforgettable journey from his childhood in an austere boarding school through his successful career in comedy, television, theater, and film. Coming of age as a writer and comedian during the Sixties and Seventies, Eric stumbled into the crossroads of the cultural revolution and found himself rubbing shoulders with the likes of George Harrison, David Bowie, and Robin Williams, all of whom became dear lifelong friends. With anecdotes sprinkled throughout involving other close friends and luminaries such as Mike Nichols, Mick Jagger, Steve Martin, Paul Simon, Lorne Michaels, and many more, as well as the Pythons themselves, Eric captures a time of tremendous creative output with equal parts hilarity and heart.