Author Autographed

//Author Autographed
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  • Laurie Lawrence is a remarkable Australian - a maker of champions, capable of lifting the spirits of those around him to soaring heights. As a swim coach possessing the gift of inspiration he is without peer, and his line-up of champions - Steve Holland, Tracey Wickham, Jon Sieben, Duncan Armstrong, Julie McDonald - bears gold medal testimony to his qualities. But Laurie Lawrence is very many other things too - extrovert, patriot, poet, humorist, singer and, in the 1990s, the most sought-after motivational speaker in Australia. Lawrence of Australia captures the essence of the man through 24 remarkable stories of sport and its champions. In these deeply personal, funny and very often inspiring tales, Lawrence uncovers profound secrets of success which translate to all walks of life. It is a book for everyone - entertaining, revealing and vastly uplifting.
  • Have you killed any strangers lately? Try it - it can be fun! All you have to do is make a friend; because every time you make a friend you kill a stranger. Each person whose story is in this book has learnt this exciting, valuable lesson.  Many people, able-bodied and disabled, find it hard to make friends.  The book issues the challenge to the claim that normal (?) people are responsible for the non-acceptance of disabled folk in the full life of the community.  The disabled can equally be at fault. "It's a bit like the generation gap - both sides must be willing to walk some of the way across the bridge of communication." Here are REAL people willing to share their hidden scars and their joyous victories.
  • Galway, universally recognised as the man with the golden flute, recounts his life that began in the back streets of Belfast, where 'everybody played an instrument and if they couldn't afford one, they sang'. For six years he was principal flautist with the Berlin Philharmonic under Herbert von Karajan and he also played with the London Symphony orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic. His subsequent solo concerts and recordings have established him as a virtuoso with a superb technique. He began playing the mouth organ, then the violin and then the flute - a complete individualist, of whom von Karajan said, "Talking to Jimmy Galway is like talking to a man from Mars!"
  • Martin Fartingale hates English weather, hates Cornwall and most of all, hates his name. He is staying with his mother and batty grandmother in a small fishing village over looking St. Cecils Mount, an intriguing rocky blob at the end of a causeway out to sea. Ignoring the warnings of  his new school friends Danny and Charlotte (Charlie) that no-one has ever escaped from St. Cecils Mount, Mart5in decides to break into the ancient building and explore. He finds himself face to face with Gregor, the Mad Monk, Ursula, a black witch - and he must defeat Sir Bullimore Fergus in sword fighting and the Black Knight in a joust, with unexpected allies the ghost of Uncle Septimus Fartingale (who appears as a foul-smelling green vapour) and a white witch who looks remarkably like Charlie.
  • "Shane O'Donnell" was born to almost total deafness, yet he grew up to play an important part in the development of the Ord River Dam area and in conserving the natural life of that fascinating environment.  The "O'Donnell" family are real.  Their names were changed for the publication of this book. This is a case history of how to do the best for profoundly deaf children but more it is a story of a fight against the odds - and winning.

  • In the mid-1840s a thirteen-year-old British cabin boy, Gemmy Fairley, is cast ashore in the far north of Australia and taken in by aborigines. Sixteen years later he steps out of the bush and inadvertently confronts the new white settlers, hopeful yet terrified, staking out their small patch of home in an alien place. To them, Gemmy stands as a different kind of challenge: he is a force that at once fascinates and repels. His own identity in this new world is as unsettling to him as the knowledge he brings to others of the indigenous people who cared for him.
  • Higham alleges that "Errol Flyn could have been tried for treason. The world-famous star could have ended his life on a hangman's noose." Dramatic? Definitely.  He also alleges that he has seen documents, now declassified and therefore available to the public, that prove the star of Robin Hood, They Died With Their Boots On, Captain Blood and many other films was in fact a spy for the Gestapo, working together with Dr. Hermann Erben, leading SS man, and that the film industry was involved in the cover up.  And yet more - Higham also claims Flynn the Infamous Womaniser also had affairs with Howard Hughes, fellow heart throb actor Tyrone Power and Truman Capote. Manslaughter, drug running and gold smuggling are also alleged.  The declassified documents that Higham claims are not reproduced in this book - only listed.
  • Hickey travelled from the New South Wales bush, via shearing camps, harness maker's workshop and the election platforms of the newly-formed Australian Labour Movement to membership and later, secretary of the parliamentary Labour Party in New South Wales. He was an anti-conscriptionist in World War I; chairman of the Public Works Committee in 1920-21;  and a member of the Legislative Council in 1925-34. He was ahead of his time, holding enlightened views on the employment of youths and was well stocked with bush lore, writing many paragraphs for the Bulletin. His reminiscences, written during a visit to South America and the U.S.A., are filled with anecdotes of the Sydney political scene of the 1890s and the early years of the new century and are colourfully told.
  • A chance encounter in a fish-’n’-chip shop set Brendan James Murray on the trail of a mystery. Had a gay man been secretly murdered on H.M.A.S Australia during the Second World War? The veteran he spoke to was certain. ‘I knew about it,’ he said. ‘We all did.’ But was the story true? If so, who was the dead man? And why was it so hard to find out? This book is the search for the answer, almost stone-walled by cover-up and silence. In the end, it brings us to the lies that have shrouded our understanding of war, and especially of war at sea. As one of the survivors poignantly says, ‘I want to pass it on to the next generation. What it was like. What it was really like.’