Author Autographed

//Author Autographed
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  • A chance encounter in a fish-’n’-chip shop set Brendan James Murray on the trail of a mystery. Had a gay man been secretly murdered on H.M.A.S Australia during the Second World War? The veteran he spoke to was certain. ‘I knew about it,’ he said. ‘We all did.’ But was the story true? If so, who was the dead man? And why was it so hard to find out? This book is the search for the answer, almost stone-walled by cover-up and silence. In the end, it brings us to the lies that have shrouded our understanding of war, and especially of war at sea. As one of the survivors poignantly says, ‘I want to pass it on to the next generation. What it was like. What it was really like.’
  • An extremely rare copy of a limited edition book that has been devalued by the uploading of a PDF version to the Internet.  Frederic Slaney Poole stepped off the St. Vincent at Port Adelaide on November 30, 1867. His descendant has told his incredible story of his life from his role as a horseback priest to becoming Canon.
  • Edward Francis "Eddie" Charlton,  AM (31 October 1929 – 8 November 2004) was an Australian professional snooker and English billiards player. He won the Australian Professional Championship numerous times, was the Pot Black Champion three times and winner of the Kronenbrau 1308 Classic and the Limosin International. He will be remembered fondly by Australians  as 'Steady Eddie' and his appearances on the BBC-TV programme Pot Black.      
  • Armed robbery, murder, lies, treachery, 'confession' and legal tangle that ended in a sensational trial, followed by three executions - all the ingredients of a callous crime committed on the New Zealand goldfields in 1866. A gang of brutal Londoners - Richard Burgess, Tom Noon (Noonan), Joseph Sullivan and Phil Levy waylaid five gold-laden prospectors on a lonely track on Maungatapu ('Sacred Mountain'), killed them and hid the bodies before going on a spree. The prospectors were missed, and suspicion fell on the four. Hoping for a free pardon, Sullivan 'dobbed' on his mates and Burgess wrote a confession but implicated Sullivan. Clune traces the lives of the four and shows the influences played such an important role in shaping their twisted lives - the overcrowded Thames-side slums created by the Industrial Revolution, the laws that punished rather than reformed, the rotting prison hulks, the transportation system and the mental cruelty in the prisons of the day.
  • Nevare Burvelle, second son of a new-made lord, is getting ready to enter the Cavalla Academy, serve on the frontier and then on to an advantageous marriage.  At the Academy he will encounter prejudice from the old aristocracy as well as injustice, discrimination and foul play in a hostile and competitive  environment.  His world view will be challenged by his unconventional girl-cousin Epiny and by bizarre dreams which come to him at night. He will learn about the Speck people - dapple-skinned forest dwellers, who worship trees and retain the last traces of magic in the progressive and technologised world. Sexual congress with Specks is regarded  as filthy - they harbour disease. And then, on Dark Night, the carnival comes to Old Thares, bringing with it the first Specks Nevare has ever seen.
  • Older than the Melbourne Cup, the Derby is restricted to three year olds and run at set weights.  Here is the history of the Derby, with a roll call of famous horses, both winners and also-rans and the effect that this race has had on so many careers. With black and white photographs.
  • In the landscape of Northern Queensland, these stories are narrated by Leverton, who calls himself a people-freak - fascinated by the hordes of misfits and drop-outs coming from the south.  There is The Fixer, who lives by himself with his verse-making and heart-break;  Willy Fourcorners, the elderly Aboriginal; the elegant Father Rassini and Sadie, who had failed in love and was forced to humility. Witty and outrageously comedic, yet the stories are touching with the sadness of self-delusion.
  • "If people turn to look at you in the street, you are not well dressed, but either too stiff, too tight, or too fashionable." So said Beau Brummell, the first metrosexual, 200 years before the word was even invented. His name has become synonymous with wit, profligacy, fine tailoring, and fashion. A style pundit, Brummell was responsible for changing forever the way men dress - inventing, in effect, the suit. He cut a dramatic swath through British society, from his early years as a favorite of the Prince of Wales and an arbiter of taste in the Age of Elegance, to his precipitous fall into poverty, incarceration, and madness, creating the blueprint for celebrity crash and burn, falling dramatically out of favor and spending his last years in a hellish asylum. But for nearly two decades, Brummell ruled over the tastes and pursuits of the well heeled and influential - deemed more important than Napoleon and the inspiration for Byron's Don Juan. Through love letters, historical records, and poems, Ian Kelly reveals the man inside the suit, unlocking the scandalous behavior of London's high society while illuminating Brummell's enigmatic life in the colorful, tumultuous West End. A rare rendering of an era filled with excess, scandal, promiscuity, opulence, and luxury, 'Beau Brummell' is the first comprehensive view of an elegant and ultimately tragic figure whose influence continues to this day.
  • Larry Adler raised the mouth-organ from children's toy and music-hall turn to big time film and show business.  He appeared alongside Eddie Cantor, Fred Astaire, George Gershwin; he played at special performances for President Roosevelt, the King of Sweden and the Prince of Wales.  He toured with Jack Benny and Ingrid Bergman during the war.  Then came McCarthyism and the destruction of his career.  He moved to England and continued into journalism, and was nominated for an Oscar for his film score of Genevieve. Billie Holliday once remarked of his talent: "Man, you don't play that f***ing thing, you SING it!"  Autographed by Larry Adler.