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  • Hollywood hunk and swash-buckler Stewart Granger tells of his leap to stardom in The Man In Grey and his overnight Hollywood success in King Solomon's Mines. He battled studio bosses, including Howard Hughes, experienced near-fatal accidents in film stunts that he always insisted on doing himself and had very close encounters with wild animals while filming in Africa and India - not to mention the temptation of being thrown together with some of the most beautiful women in the world.  This iconic actor tells his story his way -with frankness, modesty and homeliness.   Known for heroic sword fighting-roles such as The Prisoner of Zenda and Beau Brummell, Granger says: "I always thought I was big until I played opposite John Wayne in North to Alaska!"
  • In the landscape of Northern Queensland, these stories are narrated by Leverton, who calls himself a people-freak - fascinated by the hordes of misfits and drop-outs coming from the south.  There is The Fixer, who lives by himself with his verse-making and heart-break;  Willy Fourcorners, the elderly Aboriginal; the elegant Father Rassini and Sadie, who had failed in love and was forced to humility. Witty and outrageously comedic, yet the stories are touching with the sadness of self-delusion.
  • Stockton served overseas for three years with the RAAF and during this time completed his degree by correspondence.  He has taught at Narrandera and Wauchope High Schools and was Deputy Principal at Cowra and Springwood High Schools.  In 1976 he also became the first principal at the new high school at Cambridge Park and saw it grow from an initial enrolment of 246 students to be the third largest secondary school in the Sydney area.  In his story he experiences the discomforts and frustrations as well as the funny side of teaching and the adventure of such a career. This book is from a limited printing of only 1000.
  • The story of Robert Six - ex-sailor, ex-truck driver and ex-pilot - the man behind one of America's more dramatic success stories.  Six's career began in the pioneering days of aviation and continued into the age of jet and supersonic transport.  A lively view of the history of commercial airlines in America, full of anecdotes and regarded as entertaining.
  • Older than the Melbourne Cup, the Derby is restricted to three year olds and run at set weights.  Here is the history of the Derby, with a roll call of famous horses, both winners and also-rans and the effect that this race has had on so many careers. With black and white photographs.
  • Have you killed any strangers lately? Try it - it can be fun! All you have to do is make a friend; because every time you make a friend you kill a stranger. Each person whose story is in this book has learnt this exciting, valuable lesson.  Many people, able-bodied and disabled, find it hard to make friends.  The book issues the challenge to the claim that normal (?) people are responsible for the non-acceptance of disabled folk in the full life of the community.  The disabled can equally be at fault. "It's a bit like the generation gap - both sides must be willing to walk some of the way across the bridge of communication." Here are REAL people willing to share their hidden scars and their joyous victories.
  • Here is a collection of poems all based on real events, highlighting the spirit of Australians.  There is humor, history, mystery;  past events and characters that were part of the landscape of Australia and who,  sadly, are seen no more.  Just some of the titles: Mona Vale Surf Rescue; The Wilga Ghost; Outback Library Man; The Old Camp Oven; Barnado Boy; The Anzacs; Cyclone Tracy and many more. Beautifully illustrated by Jenny Colless.
  • Hickey travelled from the New South Wales bush, via shearing camps, harness maker's workshop and the election platforms of the newly-formed Australian Labour Movement to membership and later, secretary of the parliamentary Labour Party in New South Wales. He was an anti-conscriptionist in World War I; chairman of the Public Works Committee in 1920-21;  and a member of the Legislative Council in 1925-34. He was ahead of his time, holding enlightened views on the employment of youths and was well stocked with bush lore, writing many paragraphs for the Bulletin. His reminiscences, written during a visit to South America and the U.S.A., are filled with anecdotes of the Sydney political scene of the 1890s and the early years of the new century and are colourfully told.
  • The author of these beautiful indigenous poems is also known as Ken Canning. Powerful titles, including: Fair Skin - Black Soul; Man Of Peace; Mind Installation; Spiritless Man; Temporary Town and more.