Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction

//Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction
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  • Originally published in twelve volumes, this edition revised by the author and Jane Caplan is the essence of that original work. It is also a redrafted, revised and updated version. Chapters: The Shape Of History; The Geneses Of Civilisations; The Growth Of Civilisations; The Breakdown Of Civilisations; The Disintegrations Of Civilsations; Universal States; Universal Churches; Heroic Ages; Contacts Between Civilisations In Space; Contacts Between Civilisations In Time; Why Study History?  With over 500 illustrations.
  • Dickens' Mr Micawber solved his problems by emigrating to Australia; his example was followed by Dickens' own sons.  Alfred arrived in 1865 and younger brother Edward three years later. They both became managers and part-owners of stations in the far west of New South Wales, and stock and station agents. Alfred moved to Victoria and lectured both in Australia and overseas.  Edward went to live in Wilcannia which he represented in Parliament.  They may not have won fame or fortune, but their story, partly told through family letters, is still absorbing and would be of interest to any fan of Dickens.
  • Like a tramp, a pilgrim or a wandering scholar, an 18 year-old boy set out one wet December day in 1933 to walk to Constantinople. In that year, when Hitler came to power, adventure beckoned and youth was golden for Patrick Leigh Fermor as he tramped up the Rhine and down the Danube towards the mysterious gateway to the East - sleeping barns, or in fairy tale castles, losing his possessions and being showered with gifts. But there was more to discover than freedom and the camaraderie of the road:  the arts, landscapes, religions, languages, histories and above all, the people of a dozen civilisations unfolded before his hungry young mind - sharply outlined before the gathering storm. This volume covers his journey from the Hook of Holland to the Middle Danube.
  • Ben Rutherford was brought up on a high country sheep station in New Zealand, and brought up the old fashioned way. Here he shares his stories of high country farming, swaggers, station cooks and their eccentric temperament, dog trials, horse racing, pig and deer shooting and other rumbustious elements of the New Zealand way of life...a way of life so rumbustious that a farmer member of the Christchurch Club was once heard to exclaim: "It's not the rabbits I'm worrying about, it's the Rutherfords!"
  • Mrs. Ritter left a very comfortable home to keep house for her husband and a Norwegian trapper in a hut that measured 12ft x 6 ft on Spitzbergebn, some 60 miles from the only neighbour. She was there for a year, often alone for long periods of time while the men were about their affairs - she was alone during her first Arctic blizzard; at other times she went with them on their journeys across snow and ice. Although she came to the experience reluctantly, she  fell in love with the lonely island wilderness and all its marvels - from its dark and violent winter to the rose and violet hues of the Arctic summer. Here are stories of bear hunts, blizzards, hazard trekking, making friends with a white polar fox which she named Mikkl as well as the domestic scenes of life within four narrow walls.  At this time, the Arctic was regarded as for men only - but Christiane proved this to be all wrong.

  • On April 6, 1924, eight courageous young Army airmen too off on a 26,000 mile journey into the record books.  Three years before Lindbergh flew from New York to Paris, they set out from Seattle in four open-cockpit bi-planes, determined to circle the globe - and they did it. They were battered by blizzards and typhoons, lost in sandstorms and blinding fog and had even given up two of their number for dead.  Here is the epic story of the first around-the-world flight.
  • Ten noted anthropologists examine the evolution of Aboriginal power from pre-white contact to the 1980s.  The first five chapters deal with power relations and ideologies in traditional and tradition-oriented Aboriginal societies and power in relation to myth, land rights, leadership and socialisation. The remaining chapters focus on Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders are are more integrated into Australian society, mainly urban dwellers; the political middlemen, internal colonialism, the formation  of a pan-Aborignal identity and the question of Aboriginal power in an urban setting in general.  As a whole, the book offers a wide-ranging examination of the power possessed by Aborigines and how Aborigines perceive power among themselves and in relation to others. The contributors are: Michael. C. Howard; E. Kolig; D.H. Turner; K. Maddock; F.R. Myers; R. Tonkinson; J. Beckett; J.C. Pierson; and D.J. Jones; J. Hill-Burnett.
  • First published in 1964 this book examines the integration of indigenous and white society that was begun over twenty years earlier. It examines the effects the policy had on the lives of the indigenous people and if it was an enlightened decision that took account of the wishes and needs of the indigenous people.  Dr. Reay asked a group of young anthropologists to examine the implications of the policy through research and fieldwork in various key communities. The findings provided a fascinating record of modern indigenous life and a jolt to those who assume that assimilation was going to be the last word. Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • After making  a brilliant impact at the RSC in the 1960s, Ian Holm consolidated his reputation with work for Harold Pinter then turned to film, appearing in cult/popular classics such as Alien, Chariots of Fire, The Fifth Element and Lord Of The Rings. His varied career has seen him play an android, Napoleon, King Lear, Hercule Poirot, Lewis Carroll, a hobbit and much more.  Large Print edition.