Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction

//Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction
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  • A selection of James'  TV Criticism columns from The Observer 1972 - 1976.  
  • Vivien Leigh won international acclaim at the age of twenty-six when she crossed the Atlantic and walked off with the coveted part of Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind under the noses of some of Hollywood's most famous stars. For this part alone she has earned a lasting place in film history.Loved by millions,  Vivien had a illustrious stage and screen career that spanned thirty years.  She triumphed in such diverse roles as Blanche Dubois  in A Streetcar Named Desire and Cleopatra, playing opposite her husband Laurence Olivier.  She was a complex and driven personality, a brilliant actress whose terrifying dips into manic depression were little understood by those around here. This is no 'Hollywood' filmography, but an intensely researched biography that includes Vivien Leigh's parents and a detailed history of her relationship with Leigh Holman. Of course, her love for Laurence Olivier and their twenty year marriage is covered, so much of it made difficult by recurring bouts of tuberculosis and manic depression. Vickers, drawing on many hours of conversation with her devoted friend, the actor John Merivale, explained how Vivien re-established her life after the divorce. Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • Vivien Leigh won international acclaim at the age of twenty-six when she crossed the Atlantic and walked off with the coveted part of Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind under the noses of some of Hollywood's most famous stars. For this part alone she has earned a lasting place in film history. Loved by millions,  Vivien had a illustrious stage and screen career that spanned thirty years.  She triumphed in such diverse roles as Blanche Dubois  in A Streetcar Named Desire and Cleopatra, playing opposite her husband Laurence Olivier.  She was a complex and driven personality, a brilliant actress whose terrifying dips into manic depression were little understood by those around here. This is no 'Hollywood' filmography, but an intensely researched biography that includes Vivien Leigh's parents and a detailed history of her relationship with Leigh Holman. Of course, her love for Laurence Olivier and their twenty year marriage is covered, so much of it made difficult by recurring bouts of tuberculosis and manic depression. Vickers, drawing on many hours of conversation with her devoted friend, the actor John Merivale, explained how Vivien re-established her life after the divorce. Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • In 1932, starlet Carlotta Monti met Fields on a back lot at Paramount.  For the next fourteen years, she was his mistress, sharing his bed, board and bar in a series of rented mansions. She witnessed his bickering with directors and studios, his exuberant pranks and verbal fireworks.  She was there until the tragic end of his battle with alcohol. This insightful memoir is packed with bizarre anecdotes, exclusive reminiscences and often ribald glimpses into the private life of one of Hollywood's most outrageous personalities. Illustrated with black and white photgraphs.
  • Walter Matthau (1920 - 2000) was once described as 'about as likely a candidate for stardom as the neighbourhood delicatessen man' Walter Matthau worked long and hard to achieve public recognition. AT the age of 45 he found the perfect role in The Odd Couple and became the oldest overnight success in the business. He quickly established himself as a top box-office attraction, won an Oscar for the conniving shyster lawyer in The Fortune Cookie and continued to delight audiences with a string of movie hits: The Sunshine Boys, Kotch, Charley Varrick, The Front Page, The Bad News Bears, Pete 'n' Tillie and House Calls.  Hunter chronicles Matthau's tough childhood in New York, his early jobs as boxing instructor, basketball coach and filing clerk; his lifelong (and expensive) addiction to gambling; his distinguished Air Force service record; the years as a villain in films like King Creole; his doctor's prediction on his heart: 'My Doctor gave me six months to live; when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more'; the disastrous making of  Hello, Dolly with Barbra Streisand and happier partnerships with Jack Lemmon, Neil Simon, George Burns and Glenda Jackson.
  • Published in 1978, this is the book that tells Australians who they really are via the controversial perception by the author of Australian apathy, greed and intolerance while scrambling for a fast buck and endless possessions - not to mention being lazy and overweight as well. And delusional. King - a descendant of Philip Gidley King, Governor of N.S.W. 1800 - 1806 - explodes the myths of the hard-working outback heroes to replace them with I'm all right Jack...I'm getting rich quick...I'm getting my share of...on the grounds that  the spirit of materialism has waltzed through Australian history for too long. Illustrated by John Spooner.
  • Here is a hidden story and its telling is long overdue. A young Aboriginal girl is released from the spartan strictness of mission upbringing and sent to work as a domestic servant on a property in the wealthy farming district.  She is 16 and cut off from all help - a 24 hour captive of an aloof and puzzling family.  Her initial reactions are hurt and astonishment but her resourcefulness grows with her experience of life.  She's a survivor, despite petty tyranny and humiliating treatment, behaviour so callous it is hard to believe that this true account occurred only in the 1960s and not a hundred years ago.
  • A fascinating insight into the life and times of the men and women immortalised in the literature of King Arthur and the Round Table.  The authors present a detailed picture of the culture, weapons and places associated with Britain's most famous king, ranging from the true sixth century origins to the romances and chronicles of the Middle Ages. Featuring original illustrations researched by the authors and painted by Richard Hook, new colour photographs of the most famous sites, and numerous black and white illustrations including archaeological reconstructions. Included is a rare list of the original names of the 250 of Arthur's warriors, an examination of the 12 great battles fought against the Saxon invaders in the sixth century, and descriptions of the legendary and sometimes magical weapons attributed to the Celtic king and his men. A special feature, unique to this reassessment of Arthurian history and legend, is the inclusion of six new stories by the authors. Through this feature, familiar Arthurian adventures are retold in their true sixth century cultural context. Cover art by Richard Hook.
  • Explosive and controversial, Waterfront exposes, for the first time, the real story behind the bitter 1998 war on the wharves which divided Australians and changed the nature of the workplace forever. This shocking exposè reveals who was behind it and what it means for all Australians. It all began with a 'deep throat' phone call to John Coombs, the head of Australia's most militant union, the Maritime Union of Australia. The mystery caller warned him of a clandestine plot to destroy the union's hold on the waterfront. The controversial stand-off between the Patrick Stevedoring company and the Maritime Union became a battle for the hearts and minds of the average Australian. Veteran Sydney Morning Herald journalists Trinca and Davies covered the waterfront dispute from the very beginning and take us behind the headlines to tell the real story of this real-life political thriller. Illustrated with black and white photographs. A very scarce, autographed first printing;  a derogatory reference to Peter Costello caused this issue to be recalled and pulped.