Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction

//Autobiography/Bio/Non-Fiction
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  • Long before the tsunami struck on 26 December 2004, the villagers of Nam Khem had learnt they needed large amounts of luck and determination to get by. Dang and her neighbours were battling the government and a mining company for possession of their homes. After he became blind and lost his successful business, Puek and his wife Lek gave tourists beach-side massages. Nang collected coconuts to pay her husband's hospital bills after he was shot for lobster fishing in Burmese waters. And Wimon and Watcheree were just pleased to have two healthy children, since Wimon's mother seldom allowed the couple to sleep in the same bed. They were all in the path of the world's deadliest tsunami which killed over 200,00o people in 13 countries.  Erich Krauss arrived in the Thai village of Nam Khem on a relief truck 12 days after the disaster; wandering around the wreckage in a contamination suit, trying to deliver food and water, he found survivors desperate to tell him what their village had been like and how their lives had been changed forever. This is the story of four families from one Thai village, who started that day with little and ended with nothing.
  • The story of Australia began thousands of years ago when Pythagoras calculated that there must be a Great Southern Land to maintain the equilibrium of the Earth.  Australia is fortunate that in its history of discovery, exploration and settlement by Europeans is documented from the beginning. Some documentation is fragmentary but that makes an adventure in piecing together the whole story. The eventual discovery of the world's largest island unfolds with accounts of the many Spanish, Dutch and Portugese attempts to discover and chart the coast, the ships which met their doom on the reef-riddled shores and then settlement by the British - more an attempt to keep the French out as the British had no intention of exploring beyond the penal colony at Sydney Cove. This is the story of Australia's discovery and maritime exploration from the early, accidental encounters to the hydrographical surveys of the Royal Australian Navy.  Also included is a list of 1500 coastal features showing how each got its name.
  • Mrs. Gunn's timeless classic was first published in 1908.  Newly married, Jeannie Gunn accompanies her husband to 'The Elsey' the huge cattle station in the Northern Territory, several hundred miles from the nearest town.  She is one of the very few white women n the area and at first her presence is resented by the stockmen until her warmth and spirit win their affection and respect.  A rare chronicle of pioneer life in the outback, written with moving simplicity to convey the beauty and cruelty of the land, the isolation and loneliness, and the comradeship and kindness of the early settlers.

  • We Of The Never-Never: Newly married, Jeannie Gunn accompanies her husband to 'The Elsey' the huge cattle station in the Northern Territory, several hundred miles from the nearest town.  She is one of the very few white women n the area and at first her presence is resented by the stockmen until her warmth and spirit win their affection and respect.  A rare chronicle of pioneer life in the outback, written with moving simplicity to convey the beauty and cruelty of the land, the isolation and loneliness, and the comradeship and kindness of the early settlers. The Little Black Princess: an account of the early life of a small Aboriginal girl who took refuge with Mrs Gunn for a short time in 1902. The child is named Bett-Bett in the novel and though the name was changed, Bett-Bett is based on events surrounding an Aboriginal child at Elsey Station.[3] That child was said by Mrs. Gunn in 1937 to have been a niece of Ibimel Wooloomool, who she described as "the King or Chief of the Elsey River tribes".
  • Wages were cut by 20 per cent, but not the mortgage.  The dole was a pittance. People lived in shanty towns and camped in empty buildings. They stood in queues, seemingly forever, despised by bureaucrats and slowly losing their self respect...And there were weevils in the flour.  This book was five years in the making, taken from over 200 taped interviews - teachers and carpenters, soldier settlers, wharfies, Communist spokesmen, miners, swaggies, policemen and businessmen. There are interviews with those who were children at the time; housewives, husbands, single men and women. This is a grass roots study of a period of Australian history described by the people to whom it happened, who endured, suffered and made the best of it. But more than that, it is a study  in human understanding - as we learn to live someone else's life: to beg for food, to walk miles to find walk, faint with hunger, to jump trains, make clothes out of flour bags, live for days on half a case of rotten pears, to make do...and still preserve our human dignity.  The Sydney Morning Herald: 'The range of this book is immense...it should become a major work of reference in Australian social history.'
  • A detailed history of the heavy metal greats, chronicled from their beginnings as The New Yardbirds, the changes wrought over the years and the influences of the blues music from the early 1900s as well as the fantasy images from Tolkien that made Led Zeppelin the most unique rock band in music history. Includes interviews with band members and the author, previously unseen photographs and a unique double image cover.
  • Hilarious. Incredible. Bizarre. Witty. Deliciously malicious! Where There's a Will is an absorbing collection of odd and curious wills from many countries and many times. Vindictive wills, revealing wills, wills written on nurses' petticoats, eggshells, tractor fenders and wills found in a bottle at sea included in the book reflect the full range of man's virtues and vices. The colorful individuals whose Last Will and Testament grace the pages of this book give more than their money away - they give themselves away. They use their wills to get back at obnoxious relatives, to maintain control beyond the grave, to reward, to punish, to defy those who say you can't take it with you. And to have the last word. Among the famous and the infamous whose wills are featured are: George Bernard Shaw, W.C. Fields, Patrick Henry, Janis Joplin, Napoleon, Jack Kelly, Howard Hughes, William Shakespeare, Ian Fleming, Billy Rose, Picasso, Marilyn Monroe, Aristotle Onassis. . . and many more.
  • This collection of essays from the second Whitlam Conference of Labor Historians marks a further important stage in documenting the history of the Australian Labor Party.  More than just a record for future generations, it is  a handbook for the late 1980s and a guide for those charged with implementing Labor policies for the Australian Government.  Topics covered: Aboriginal Land Rights; Education; Health; Reform of the Public Sector and Urban Policy. Contributors: Gough Whitlam; Bob Carr; Sol Encel; Graham Freudenberg; Marc Gumbert; Race Mathews; Tom Uren; Peter Wilenski and Deane Wells.
  • Songwriter, composer, lead guitarist and creative powerhouse behind The Who, Pete Townshend is a pre-eminent influence on rock. Spearheading Sixties rock smashing guitars and writing songs which challenged the function of popular music. Townsend created the power chord and broke the three-minute mould of the pop song in Tommy, Quadrophenia and later works. His intelligence, imagination and restless mind led him into uncharted waters; and he is still exploring and inspiring countless up and coming musicians. This is his own story; his difficult childhood and its repercussions later in life; and his quest to understand his own past while keeping faith with his audience.