Militaria

//Militaria
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  • The Kokoda Track is the symbol of World War II for Australians. This book takes readers up that tortuous track and into battle with the young men who fought there, following in the footsteps of heroes and villains as they climb the endless mountain ranges, dig into defend, charge into battle or begin the long, desperate and bloody trek to safety.  Here can also be found the perspective of the Japanese troops and the extraordinary local people who the Diggers called  'angels'.

  • Described as the biography of a common soldier with thirty three years of service in the American Army, this 'uncommon' soldier distinguished himself in the Argonne in World War I and several other conflicts.  Samuel Woodfill was regarded as being a true American frontiersman who seems to have had many and varied adventures, given such chapter headings as: I Was Born with a  Gun in My Hands;  A Surprise Attack and Escape Over A Precipice; Out of Company C Only Four Men Survived; The Tragedy of A Medicine Man; The Strange End of Sam Gowler and many others just as intriguing.  Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • The inside story of the victory in Africa and Europe by Montgomery's Chief of Staff.
  • The author is a Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Research on Globalisation. This book has been rated and reviewed as a "...'must' resource - a richly documented and systematic diagnosis of the...planning of U.S. Wars since 9-11" "...one of the most important books currently available...the information is heart rending, scary and absolutely accurate." ...a hard-hitting and compelling book (which) explains why and how we must undertake  a concerted...campaign to head off the impending  cataclysmic demise of the human race and planet Earth."
  • In the space of three and a half weeks during May and June of 1940, Nazi Germany came  perilously close to winning the war a scant ten months after it started. The British Expeditionary Force and the French and Belgian allies were cut off in the North and driven to the very sands of the Channel and the ruins of Dunkirk, the lone port still in the hands of the BEF. Britain faced catastrophe. How that catastrophe was averted through a combination of enemy blunders and British resourcefulness is told here in an account that exposes the 'miracle' of Dunkirk.  Here is the true story, chronicled through diaries, memoirs and personal reminiscences of the hundreds of men who lived through those weeks; COs, foot soldiers, generals and privates. Very indepth.

  • When the Russians overran Berlin in 1945 they went through the German official archives with more vigour than discrimination.  Some material was shipped to Russia, some was destroyed and the rest scattered and trampled.  The pages of Goebbel's diary were found in the ministry courtyard, having narrowly escaped burning.  Seven thousand sheets of unburnt paper was salvaged by an amateur junk dealer, who salvaged the official document binders and made random bundles of the paper.  To get the diary in order was a Herculean task.  Here is not only the diary, but other odd documents of Goebbel's life:  receipts, drafts of speeches, expense accounts, lists of charity donations and letters.
  • The Australian Army at Home and Overseas, by Some of the Boys and published by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1942.  Chapters include: Star Over Bethlehem; Diggers in Britain; Midnight Messiah; Purple's Pup; Arab Justice; Digger v. Doughboy and so much more.  Our boys' impressions of Christmas in a cold climate and local customs as well as the American servicemen and women here in Australia.  The colour plates, interestingly, are pasted in. Tales, jokes, sketches, cartoons and  on-the-spot experiences a-plenty. Illustrated in colour and black and white. A treasure mine of information.

  • By the summer of 1941 Rommel was Hitler's favourite general. Sent to North Africa to halt the British advance into Libya, he not only stopped the British offensive but drove them back to their Egyptian base. He seemed unbeatable on the field so the British planned to kill him. On the eve of the British offensive Operation Crusader, a specially trained commando team marched into the desert and attacked Rommel's headquarters. At the same time, the newly created SAS parachuted sabotage teams close to the German airfields to knock out the enemy air forces on the ground.  The author reveals how poor planning and incompetence in high places was counterbalanced by fantastic bravery and brilliant improvisation that enabled a handful of survivors to escape back to British lines and tell the true story of Operation Flipper: the plot to kill Rommel.

  • The life and gallant death of David Tinker, Lieut. R.N. from his letters and poems.