Militaria

//Militaria
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  • Here is the full account of the air actions of the Falklands conflict in 1982. This volume includes first hand accounts from pilots involved in combat and attack mission; details of the movements and intentions of the Argentine fleet, details of the Exocet missile attacks by the Argentine Navy and much more.
  • The author is a Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Research on Globalisation. This book has been rated and reviewed as a "...'must' resource - a richly documented and systematic diagnosis of the...planning of U.S. Wars since 9-11" "...one of the most important books currently available...the information is heart rending, scary and absolutely accurate." ...a hard-hitting and compelling book (which) explains why and how we must undertake  a concerted...campaign to head off the impending  cataclysmic demise of the human race and planet Earth."
  • Published for the Royal Australian Navy buy the Australian War Memorial, Canberra in 1944. A book chockful of fabulous artwork, sketches, photographs, poems, writings and memoirs of the serving personnel of the Royal Australian Navy and their service in World War II - the men who were there as it all happened.  A must for any real war buff.  Illustrated in black and white and colour.

  • This Australian analysis was the fourth in a series of background books sponsored by the Australian Institute of International Affairs.  This book dispassionately consider the much-discussed factual and legal consequences of the 1954 international agreements with an appraisal of the circumstances of Australian and American intervention as well as the arguments for and against involvement.
  • In 1987 the Australian Government finally agreed to compensate Australian personnel who had been interned and subjected to brutal treatment in Nazi concentration camps.  A.I.F soldier Don Watt was one of those internees. Like many in the camps, Watt  thought of escape. After several short periods pf freedom he managed to stay on the run for three weeks, only to be recaptured within sight of the Swiss border. Brutal  torture by the Nazis failed to make Watt disclose details of his escape. His punishment was consignment to Auschwitz - where he was given a horrific choice.  It took fifty years for Watt to come to terms  with his experiences - an ordeal that he never mentioned to anyone, not even his immediate family - and reveal the full story. In spite of the horrors he witnessed and those in which he was forced to participate, he remained modest, straightforward, understated, courageous and laconic - a hero in the tradition of the true Australian Digger.

  • By the summer of 1941 Rommel was Hitler's favourite general. Sent to North Africa to halt the British advance into Libya, he not only stopped the British offensive but drove them back to their Egyptian base. He seemed unbeatable on the field so the British planned to kill him. On the eve of the British offensive Operation Crusader, a specially trained commando team marched into the desert and attacked Rommel's headquarters. At the same time, the newly created SAS parachuted sabotage teams close to the German airfields to knock out the enemy air forces on the ground.  The author reveals how poor planning and incompetence in high places was counterbalanced by fantastic bravery and brilliant improvisation that enabled a handful of survivors to escape back to British lines and tell the true story of Operation Flipper: the plot to kill Rommel.

  • This book dealing with the Falklands crisis is different in that it is the first major account to come from a fighting participant: Julian Thompson was Commander of 3 Commando Brigade, which played such an outstanding role in  the successful outcome of the campaign.
  • This book captures the memories of 3,700 Australian men who served in World War II. Ageing men in the 1980s, they filled in long and searching questionnaires, encouraged to look back, think back, search back to the days when they were young and growing up in a world that , still retarded by economic depression, was nevertheless lurching toward a global conflict. Here are their boyhoods, their reasons for joining up, their reactions to army life and the consequences of their service. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.