Militaria

//Militaria
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  • S.O.E. was a small, tough British secret service dirty-tricks department.  Its job was to support and stimulate resistance in occupied countries. It was wound up after the war.  Its total strength was never more than 10,000 men and 3,200 women, over a third of them secret agents - it exercised vast influence on the war all over the world. This is a readable volume on how S.O.E was created and run, the calibre of the men and women involved, what tools they used and how, when and where they used them, where they did well - and where they did badly. Illustrated with black and white photographs.

  • Using dozens of interviews with former POWs, Patsy Adam-Smith shows the strength and courage of Aussies taken prisoner in World War I, World War II and the Korean War.  The author says: 'This book has not been written for ex-prisoners: they know the homesickness of exile, the tyranny of bondage; it was written for people of today who know little of the experiences of these men and women, of their courage, endurance and pain.  It has been written for the generations to come."  Illustrated with black and white photographs.
  • From 1942 - 1945, some 22,000 Australian Service Personnel - including 71 women of the Australian Army Nursing Service - become prisoners-of-war of the Japanese. They were held in camps in Timor, Java, Sumatra, New Guinea, Borneo, Singapore, Malaya and other locations including Japan. Only 14,000 survived those three and a half years after varying experiences at the hands of their captors.  One of Nelson's earliest memories is waiting at a small country railway station to meet a returning prisoner-of-war. The man, a frail figure in a too-big army uniform, hesitated in front of a line of cheering children. Uncertain as to what was expected of him, he looked around, perhaps thought about making a speech then walked away. He was one of those 14,000 who could never fully share with anyone who was not there. Here is the story of those years. With illustrations and maps.

  • In the space of three and a half weeks during May and June of 1940, Nazi Germany came  perilously close to winning the war a scant ten months after it started. The British Expeditionary Force and the French and Belgian allies were cut off in the North and driven to the very sands of the Channel and the ruins of Dunkirk, the lone port still in the hands of the BEF. Britain faced catastrophe. How that catastrophe was averted through a combination of enemy blunders and British resourcefulness is told here in an account that exposes the 'miracle' of Dunkirk.  Here is the true story, chronicled through diaries, memoirs and personal reminiscences of the hundreds of men who lived through those weeks; COs, foot soldiers, generals and privates. Very indepth.

  • The inside story of the victory in Africa and Europe by Montgomery's Chief of Staff.
  • December, 1977:  an urgent messaged was flashed from NORAD that a Soviet satellite had begun to malfunction by flipping out of its orbit - and was going to crash into the earth's surface.  What followed was a real-life science fiction nightmare as scientists and politicians from America, Canada and the Soviet Union became embroiled in a terrifying tangle of intrigue and guessing games.  Now the full story of this nightmare is told.
  • This book dealing with the Falklands crisis is different in that it is the first major account to come from a fighting participant: Julian Thompson was Commander of 3 Commando Brigade, which played such an outstanding role in  the successful outcome of the campaign.
  • Here is the true story one young unknown flyer of World War I, based on his letters written immediately after the events of his young life that chart his progress from fledgling to a seasoned fighter.  The descriptions of air battles are among the most vivid and immediate to come out of The Great War.
  • In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.