Militaria

//Militaria
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  • Could Napoleon have won the battle of Waterloo? And what would have happened if he had? Or suppose Nelson had not destroyed the French fleet at Aboukir, would Napoleon have conquered India and become Emperor of the East? What if Hitler had not halted his panzer forces before Dunkirk and had entrapped the entire British Expeditionary Force? How would Churchill have then denied the Wehrmacht? If by chance Hitler had been assassinated in 1944 and the German General Staff taken control, would there have been a totally different kind of surrender? In examining these and other contingencies, Major General Strawson brings his experience of command in war and his skill as a military historian to present us with an enthralling catalogue of chance and speculation, while emphasising how profoundly the character of commanders influenced events and how events affected their character.
  • Published for the Australian Military Forces by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, in 1944. Full of sketches, poems, colour plates and photographs, cartoons and jokes, as well as those fabulous yarns that Aussies can tell so well - and all by the service personnel who were engaged in the South West Pacific during World War II.  Contributors are identified only by their service numbers...so your grandfather or great grandfather may be among the authors.  Here we do not find battle statistics, plans or  generals - just the down to earth Australian Diggers.

  • With the Australian Army at Home and Overseas.  Published for the Australian Military Forces by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 1943.  With news and information  - literally - as it happened from the Middle East and the South West Pacific. Chapters and writings include: Alamein Christmas Shops; Luck and Gus; I Saw a Panzer Attack; The Log Which Wasn't; Moon Madness; Survival of the Fairest; No Mates in the Army and much more, all written by Australia's Own. With stories, yarns, cartoons, poems, fabulous colour plates, black and white illustrations and photographs. Real war history.

  • The Kokoda Track is the symbol of World War II for Australians. This book takes readers up that tortuous track and into battle with the young men who fought there, following in the footsteps of heroes and villains as they climb the endless mountain ranges, dig into defend, charge into battle or begin the long, desperate and bloody trek to safety.  Here can also be found the perspective of the Japanese troops and the extraordinary local people who the Diggers called  'angels'.

  • The Solomon Island archipelago stretches in a roughly east-west direction from New Guinea to San Cristobal. For the Imperial Japanese forces in 1942, it was a natural highway into the South Pacific. When checked at Guadalcanal, these forces realized they had moved east too quickly, and that their defeat was caused in part by inadequate air bases between the front and their head-quarters at Rabaul, more than six hundred miles away. As the last Japanese battalions were wrecking themselves against the Marine defensive perimeter on Guadalcanal, the decision was made to build the Munda airfield on New Georgia, right in the middle of the Solomons chain. This is the dramatic, harrowing story of green American soldiers encountering for the first time impenetrable swamps, solid rain forests, invisible coconut-log pillboxes, tenacious snipers tied into trees, torren-tial tropical rains, counterattack by enemy aircraft and naval guns, and the logistical nightmare of living and moving in endless mud.
  • World War I saw a significant and tragic change to the prosecution of war.  Allied passenger and merchant ships were blatantly attacked by the enemy, resulting in dreadful civilian losses.  The mystery ships were then created - they were disguised as peaceful merchant ships, but which were equipped with guns hidden until a few seconds before opening fire on enemy submarines. They cruised on the trade routes, hoping to encounter enemy submarines  and attract them to attack, and when the submarine came to the surface, bombard her with heavy armament. The guns had to be accurate, necessitating rigid drill and discipline - one officer or man making an error would give the show away and risk the ship and crew. This book, first published in 1928, is the first to tell the real story of life on board and the stories of attacks on and by submarines as well as describing the life on board - the discomforts, difficulties and dangers of this method of fighting back. There was also an explanation of the attraction this form of service has for men who were independent and courageous with a strict sense of moral  duty. The crew were constantly on alert: one false step could lead to the ship being torpedoed, with those left to try and save themselves or being taken prisoner; discipline and readiness for immediate action were strict from the moment of leaving harbour until safe within the harbour on return. Campbell served on the mystery ships from 2015 to 2017, beginning as a Lieutenant-Commander R.N., and ending that part of  his naval career as a Captain R.N. with a V.C. and three D.S.O.s.  A little-known and over-looked part of war history. With illustrations by Lieutenant J.E. Broome, R.N.
  • In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.
  • In the early 1930s, Nancy Wake was enjoying a Bohemian life in Paris.  By the end of World War II, she was the Gestapo's mot wanted. After witnessing horrific Nazi brutality in Vienna, Nancy declared she would do everything in her power to rid Europe of the Nazis.  What began as a courier job developed into a highly successful escape network of Allied soldiers - so successful that Nancy had to flee France to escape the Gestapo who had dubbed her "The White Mouse" for her knack of slipping through their traps.  After training with British Special Operations, she parachuted back into France to help lead the Underground fighters. From training civilian fighters to bicycling 400 kilometres across a mountain range to find a new transmitting radio, nothing was too hard.

  • Arthur Gould Lee, who retired as an RAF air vice marshal, had the privilege of recording his feelings and actions during World War I in his letters home and what's more, his letters survived. A courageous 22-year-old, devoted to duty and well aware of the hazards he faced on the Western Front, Lee was more mature than most of his colleagues, in part by virtue of being married and in part because he had had the good fortune to have crashed during training, allowing him to log more hours of flight training  than the average replacement pilot. He didn’t like the fact that the Germans had superior aircraft, and noted the qualitative differences in opposing Albatross D.Is, D.IIs and D.IIIs, the latter dubbed the “V-strutter” and carrying two machine guns to the single one carried by the Sopwith Pup. He writes about flying through a shell-laden sky, vulnerable to bullets from above and below. He never forgot the RFC's needless sacrifices and examines the failure of the Army High Command to provide efficient planes until mid-1917 and parachutes throughout the entire war. With black and white photos.