True Crime

//True Crime
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  • This book promises the truth behind the century's most celebrated murder mystery. On a wintry night in November 1974, Sandra Rivett, nanny to the children of Lord and Lady Lucan, was brutally bludgeoned to death in the basement of their Belgravia home. Lady Lucan was also attacked and identified the attacker as her estranged husband, the 7th Earl of Lucan. That night, Lord Lucan vanished and has never been found, despite numerous sightings all over the world. The author has interviewed many of those involved, including, for the first time, Lord Lucan's wife Veronica. He gained access to the missing Earl's private papers, which yield remarkable new information. He also re-examines the forensic evidence and questions the key witnesses to produce the most likely explanation to date of what really happened on November 7, 1974.  Illustrated with black and white photographs.

  • The Goatfell Murder: Near the summit of Goatfell, the body of Edwin Robert Rose was found stuffed under a granite boulder on 28 July 1889. He was a 32-year-old builder's clerk from London who had last been seen alive on the mountain a fortnight before. His head and face had been brutally smashed, probably by rocks. The last person seen in his company, a 26-year-old engineering worker known as John Annandale, was nowhere to be found. Annandale's real name was John Watson Laurie, a pattern maker for a Glasgow locomotive firm. He was caught by police two months later and at the end of a two-day trial under an impatient judge he was found guilty of murder, despite the lack of forensic evidence or any witnesses to the deed. But was there a miscarriage of justice? The Ardlamont Mystery: Alfred John Monson began working as a gentleman's tutor for the Hambrough family in 1891. In 1893 he took the lease on the Ardlamont estate in Argyll for the shooting season. On 10 August he took Windsor Dudley Cecil Hambrough, his 20-year-old pupil, for a day's hunting in an area of woodland. A third man joined them, Edward Scott, a friend of Monson. Estate workers heard a shot, then saw Monson and Scott running to Ardlamont House carrying the guns. Monson alleged that Hambrough  had shot himself in the head by accident while climbing a fence. But with very large insurance policies having been taken out less than a week before... John Donald Merrett: He was tried for the murder of his mother, Bertha Merrett.  It was at first believed that she had committed suicide - but it was discovered that Merrett had been defrauding her. His defence was skilful and the Jury returned a verdict of "Not Proven". Not proven - but was he innocent? The Portencross Murder: Mary Gunn, her sister Jessie McLaren and her sister's husband Alex McLaren were enjoying a quiet evening at an isolated cottage when six shoots were fired. Jessie and Alex were wounded - but Mary was dead.  The family lived quietly; and were considered to be 'well-off' in the locality.  The only clues were six footprints, a few spent bullets and evidence that a stranger had been asking the way to Portencross...  
  • Armed robbery, murder, lies, treachery, 'confession' and legal tangle that ended in a sensational trial, followed by three executions - all the ingredients of a callous crime committed on the New Zealand goldfields in 1866. A gang of brutal Londoners - Richard Burgess, Tom Noon (Noonan), Joseph Sullivan and Phil Levy waylaid five gold-laden prospectors on a lonely track on Maungatapu ('Sacred Mountain'), killed them and hid the bodies before going on a spree. The prospectors were missed, and suspicion fell on the four. Hoping for a free pardon, Sullivan 'dobbed' on his mates and Burgess wrote a confession but implicated Sullivan. Clune traces the lives of the four and shows the influences played such an important role in shaping their twisted lives - the overcrowded Thames-side slums created by the Industrial Revolution, the laws that punished rather than reformed, the rotting prison hulks, the transportation system and the mental cruelty in the prisons of the day.
  • Clara and David Harris where married on Valentine's Day.  Young and in love, they developed a thriving dental business, built a half-million dollar mansion and raised the perfect family.  Then whispers of David's affair with his office assistant began to circulate through their exclusive Houston social circle.  A private detective confirmed the rumours. When Clara saw David with his mistress, she attacked the woman - then got behind the wheel of her silver Mercedes and crushed her husband to death under its wheels. A moment of madness - or a calculated crime of passion? What the headlines ultimately revealed was a high profile marriage running on empty, marital infidelity, a woman's deadly passion and the private hell behind the public life of the rich and privileged. With 8 pages of black and white photographs.

  • Here is thirty years of painstaking research into the real identity of the world's most infamous serial killer and its cover-up by the authorities. Who was the convicted killer and escaped lunatic at large in London's East End during the Whitechapel Murders of 1888? How do his alias and profession link him to the notorious first letter from 'Jack the Ripper'? What was the 'Divine Plan' he referred to before he escaped from Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum in 1888? Why did the London Police fail to catch him - although they knew who he was - and how did he remain on the run for forty years? Why are 'Prisoner 1167's' government files still classified almost sixty years after his death and sealed until 2030? What are the similarities between his murder of his wife in 1883 and the Ripper killings in 1888? Why was Broadmoor contacted about this man immediately after the most gruesome of the Ripper murders? Why does this man, the only suspect the Home Office mentioned by name, never appear in either case records or the press? James Tully reveals what he believes to be the identity of the world's most notorious serial killer.  One for the serious Ripper buff.

  • Often, the most unlikely people have committed murder and the motives for murder are infinitely varied. Dr. Schmalzbach - consulting psychiatrist to the N.S.W. Government - examines twelve notable murders of the 1960s in which he was professionally consulted as a matter of course.   The motives were different in all cases, and in all cases the mental state of the accused at the time the crime was committed  had been called in question - usually by the defence.                                                                                                                                 Dr. Schmalzbach posited that since there were some evil men, then logically, there must be some evil women. What he called the  'Delilah' syndrome was behaviour in some women that led them to behave in a way that incited violence in their partners. An brief summary published in the Sydney Morning Herald on this presentation that was to be made at an international conference in December 1982 caused a group of individual militant feminists to demand Dr. Schmalzbach's dismissal on the grounds that he was obviously a misogynist. They achieved their aim - he was dismissed, the reason being given that he had exceeded the statutory age specified for his position.
  • The scene awaiting the policemen entering the charming suburban house at 313 Carl Drive was one they would never forget. Three children and their mother had been hacked to death in their beds, the sheets and walls soaked in blood. A butcher knife and an axe lay nearby. There appeared to be no physical evidence and the detective at first suspected a bungled robbery. But as the clues were sifted and family members and friends were questioned, an appalling possibility presented itself: Could David Hendricks, grief-stricken father, away on a business trip, have methodically killed his family before he left? And why would a successful business man and devoted member of a fundamentalist religious group want his entire family eliminated? The prosecution painted a much darker picture of David Hendricks...Convicted by his first jury, awarded a new trial, a second jury concluded that Hendricks had not been proven guilty - beyond a reasonable doubt. Illustrated with black and white photos.

  • A social history with a difference - it boldly goes where social history has never gone before. Rescued from the forgotten pages of early newspapers are the true stories of adventurers such as Owen Suffolk, the poetic highwayman; Sam Poo, the Chinese bushranger; the disgrace and trial in the 1890s of the Speaker of the House; the flight of the Premier when his financial juggling failed to save his own bank; grim  goldfields murders, piracy in Melbourne Harbour and poisonings in distant London Town. With black and white photographs and illustrations.
  • With such intriguing chapters as: The Riddle of the Bordereau (the Dreyfus case); Murder in High Society (the murder of Stanford White and the affair of Evelyn Stanford nee Nesbit and Harry Thaw) ; the Tragedy of Oscar Slater (the murder of Marion Gilchrist); The Original Winslow Boy (the tragedy caused by the theft of a five shilling postal order); A Matter of High Treason (Roger Casement); The Green Bicycle Mystery (the murder of Bella Wright) ; Buccaneer in Morning Coat (Horatio Bottomley, swindler par excellence) ; The Incredible Fire Raisers (the Leopold Harris arson gang) ; Justice Comes To Nuremburg; The Double Betrayal (the case of Klaus Fuchs); Teenagers On A Roof (the thrill-killing of a police man in London, 1952) ; The Great Train Robbers.