Isaac Asimov

//Isaac Asimov
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  • As well as the title story, this volume contains: The Prime of Life; Waterclap; That Thou Art Mindful of Him; Stranger in Paradise; The Life and Times of Multivac; The Winnowing; Marching In; Old Fashioned; The Tercentenary Incident; Birth of a Notion.
  • Comrade Pyotr Shapirov has a secret of vital importance to world science but the only man with the skill to extract it from his comatose brain is American scientist Albert Morrison.  Natalya Boranova, sent by Russian high command to get Morriosn's help will stop at nothing to ensure his co-operation.  But there is one major problem  -the necessity for human miniaturisation. Wrenched from a routine conference and transported to a vast underground Soviet City dedicated to scientific experiment, Morrison is shrunk to a microscopic fraction of normal size and p0laced in a specially designed 'submarine' to be injected into Shapirov's veins to travel deep into the uncharted regions of the brain - and with only twelve hours to complete his task, Morrison must find the origins of human thought. Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • Book IV of Foundation. (Chronological order.) The Foundation hurtles into conflict with the decadent, decrepit First Empire. In this struggle for power amid the chaos of the stars, man stands at the threshold of a new, enlightened life which could easily be put aside for the old forces of barbarism.Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • A feast for sci-fi fans of the 'Old Masters'.  In this volume: Foundation (Foundation I): For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying, and only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary The Foundation.  Foundation And Empire (Foundation II): Led by its founding father Hari Seldon, and utilising science and technology, the Foundation survived the greed and barbarism of its neighboring warrior-planets. Now cleverness and courage may not be enough. For the Empire - the mightiest force in the Galaxy - is even more dangerous in its death throes. Even worse, a mysterious entity called the Mule has appeared with powers beyond anything humanly conceivable. Who - or what - is the Mule? And how is humanity to defend itself against this invulnerable avatar of annihilation? Second Foundation (Foundation III): The Foundation lies in ruins - destroyed by a mutant mind bent on humanity’s annihilation. But it’s rumored that there’s a Second Foundation hidden somewhere at the end of the Galaxy, established as insurance to preserve the knowledge of mankind. Now a desperate race has begun between the survivors of the First Foundation and an alien entity to find this last flicker of humanity’s shining past - and future hope. Yet the key to it all might be a fourteen-year-old girl burdened with a terrible secret. Is she the Foundation’s savior - or its deadliest enemy? The Stars, Like Dust (Galactic Empire I): Biron Farrell was young and naïve, but he was growing up fast. A radiation bomb planted in his dorm room changed him from an innocent student at the University of Earth to a marked man, fleeing desperately from an unknown assassin. He soon discovers that, many light-years away, his father, the highly respected Rancher of Widemos, has been murdered. Stunned, grief-stricken, and outraged, Biron is determined to uncover the reasons behind his father’s death, and becomes entangled in an intricate saga of rebellion, political intrigue and espionage. The Naked Sun (Robot II): A millennium into the future, two advancements have altered the course of human history:  the colonisation of the Galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain.  On the beautiful Outer World planet of Solaria, a handful of human colonists lead a hermit-like existence, their every need attended to by their faithful robot servants.  To this strange planet comes Detective Elijah Baley, sent from the streets of New York with his positronic partner, the robot R. Daneel Olivaw, to solve an incredible murder that has rocked Solaria to its foundations.  The victim had been so reclusive that he appeared to his associates only through holographic projection.  Yet someone had gotten close enough to bludgeon him to death while robots looked on.  Now Baley and Olivaw are faced with two clear impossibilities:  Either the Solarian was killed by one of his robots - unthinkable under the laws of Robotics - or he was killed by the woman who loved him so much that she never came into his presence... I, Robot (Robot I):  A robot must not harm a human being; a robot must obey human orders; and a robot must protect its own existence - as long as that protection does not conflict with rules one and two. With these Three Laws of Robotics, humanity embarked on a bold new era of evolution that would open up enormous possibilities - and unforeseen risks. For the scientists who invented the earliest robots weren't content that their creations should remain programmed helpers, companions, and semi-sentient worker-machines. And soon the robots themselves, aware of their own intelligence, power and humanity, aren't either. As humans and robots struggle to survive together - and sometimes against each other - in earth and in space, the future of both hangs in the balance. Here human men and women confront robots gone mad, telepathic robots, robot politicians and vast robotic intelligences that may already secretly control the world. And both are asking the same question: What is human? And is humanity obsolete?
  • Book I of Foundation. For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire - both scientists and scholars - and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation. But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. Mankind's last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and be overrun - or fight them and be destroyed. Cover art by Fred Gambino.
  • Book I of Foundation. For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire - both scientists and scholars - and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation. But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. Mankind's last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and be overrun - or fight them and be destroyed. Cover art by Tim White.
  • This one volume comprises: 2001: A Space Odyssey, Arthur C. Clarke: On the Moon, an enigma is uncovered. So great are the implications of this discovery that for the first time men are sent out deep into our solar system.But long before their destination is reached, things begin to go horribly, inexplicably wrong... A Time of Changes, Robert Silverberg: In the far future, Earth is a worn-out backwater and humanity is spread across the galaxy on worlds that began as colonies, but now feel like home, each with its own long history of a thousand years or more, and each with its own unique culture. One of the strangest is on Borthan, where the founding settlers established the Covenant, which teaches that the self is to be despised, and forbids anyone to reveal his innermost thoughts or feelings to another. On Borthan, the filthiest obscenities imaginable are the words "I" and "me." For the heinous crime of "self-baring," apostates have always paid with exile or death, but after his eyes are opened by a visitor from Earth, Kinnall Darival, prince of Salla, risks everything to teach his people the real meaning of being human... The Day of the Triffids, John Wyndham: The triffids - strange plants, seven feet tall, with a high yield of quality oil, yet armed with a lashing sting that could kill or blind. When kept under control with their stings docked, they were an asset. Bill Masen had worked with triffids almost all his life yet a moment of carelessness landed him in hospital, temporarily blinded by a triffid sting. So he misses the spectacular  green meteorite shower. He wakes the next morning to a silent world, punctuated only by random screams, shouts and occasional shuffling - no traffic sounds and none of the usual bustle of a city hospital. Removing the bandages and discovering thankfully his sight has been restored, he ventures outside to find the streets full of wandering, sightless people. He begins to connect with the fortunate few who also luckily missed the meteorite shower - but they are very few. Civilisation is ended - and now the triffids are free to roam, kill and destroy unchecked, to make the Earth theirs... I, Robot, Isaac Asimov. The Three Laws of Robotics are perfect. A robot must not harm a human. A robot must obey a human. A robot must protect its existence as long as it did not conflict with the first two Laws. But mankind wasn't content with just programmed helpers, workers and companions. And as robotics technology develops to the point that robots are aware of their power and intelligence, the robots also want more. And so  the future of both hangs in the balance. Human men and women confront robots gone mad, telepathic robots, robot politicians, and vast robotic intelligences that may already secretly control the world. And both are asking the same questions: What is human? And is humanity obsolete? All are complete and unabridged.  Classic sci-fi by the very best.
  • What are our human roots? What is the history of Man? The first homonids - creatures who stood upright and used their hands - appeared on Earth  20 million years ago. The first humans - homo sapiens - walked on Earth only 150,000 years ago. Is there a missing link? Isaac Asimov, storyteller extraordinaire, traces the discovery of our human roots step by step. Illustrated with black and white sketches. Contents: The Stone Age; Neanderthal Man; Java Man and Peking Man; The Little Ape-Men; How It Began.
  • The master story teller, the one of the great sci fi writers of the age, explores why we've been fascinated by the idea of height since ancient times and how we learnt about outer space.  Here are the stories of the first attempts at flight, the launching of the first rockets and finally, the first time a man was sent into outer space. No 1. in the Longman series.
  • Vitamins are essential to human life and health. Lack of vitamins can cause diseases such as scurvy and rickets. Asimov describes the experiments that led to the discovery that small amounts of vitamins in the diet CAN help us to be healthier and live longer. No. 14 in the Longmans series.
  • A round dozen of Asimov's choice fantasy authors. In this volume: The Candidate, Henry Slesar: A man receives numerous persistent requests for a meeting from a group called the Society For United Action - what can they possibly want? The Christmas Shadrach, Frank R. Stockton: Can a chunk of iron ore make you fall in love?  The Snow Women, Fritz Leiber: The magic of the Snow Women must be overcome if Fafhrd is to win the lovely Vlana; Invisible Boy, Ray Bradbury: an elderly lady, possibly a witch, claims she can make Charlie invisible...The Hero Who  Returned, Gerald W. Page; Toads Of Grimmerdale, Andre Norton: From the Witch World...Hertha, a noblewoman who is cast out into drifts of ice-crusted snow by her brother, seeks revenge.  A Literary Death, Martin H. Greenberg: A chronicle of a death foretold... Satan and Sam Shay, Robert Arthur: Satan challenges Sam Shay to a betting contest - who will win? Lot 249, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle:  Abercrombie Smith, Oxford athlete, notices his Egyptologist friend's  mummy keeps disappearing and reappearing and always coincidental with mysterious murders...The Witch Is Dead, Edward D. Hoch: Simon Ark, perhaps the original ghostbuster, takes an interest in a mysterious fortune-teller and some weird events at a girls’ college. I Know What You Need, Stephen King: Popular, pretty college-girl Elizabeth finds she is inexplicably attracted to Ed,  a loner, who always knows just what she needs, anytime, anywhere - but Elizabeth's room mate is suspicious enough to do some research on Ed...The Miracle Workers, Jack Vance: The Jinxmen can help Lord Faide win his battles against humans, but the First Folk must be fought with different means. Cover art by Julek Heller
  • Edited by Martin Greenberg.  In the Milky Way Galaxy of 1000 years hence, six vastly different star-faring races co-exist under a precarious, volatile truce, threatened by the most recent addition to the galactic community - Man.  This volume comprises the following stories: They Hide, We Seek, Robert Silverberg; The Diplomacy Guild, David Brin; Myryx, Robert Sheckley; The Burning Sky, Poul Anderson and Island of the Gods, Harry Turtledove.
  • This is Asimov's final collection of his fantasy stories that were not published previously. In this volume: To Your Health; The Critic on the Hearth; It's a Job; Baby, Its Cold Outside; The Time Traveler; Wine Is a Mocker; The Mad Scientist; The Fable of the Three Princes;  March Against the Foe; Northwestward; Prince Delightful and the Flameless Dragon. Also included are his thoughts on the genre of fantasy itself. Here are the fascinating musings of a wide ranging intelligence, discussing everything from Tolkien to Spielberg, from Unicorns to King Arthur, from the difference between maidens and damsels to the speed of Seven League Boots...scientifically calculated, of course!
  • It is the year 12,020 G.E. and Emperor Cleon I sits uneasily on the throne of Trantor.  In this great capital, 40 billion people have created an unimaginable technological, cultural, complex civilisation.  Yet Cleon knows there are those who would see him fall - those whom he would destroy if only he could read the future.  Hari Seldon, visiting Trantor to deliver his paper on psycho-history, doesn't know he's sealed his fate and that of humanity.  He possesses the prophetic power that makes him the most wanted man in the Empire - a power that will be known forever after as Foundation. Cover art by Fred Gambino.
  • Madam Gladia Solaria was intrigued by the barbarous settle from Baleywood who had disturbed her long middle-age on Aurora. Perhaps he was interesting because both he and his planet were named after Elijah Baley, the short-lived Earthman who'd been her lover two centuries ago. Those memories plagued her. She knew she must return with the Settler to the deserted planet of her birth, Solaria.  But the robots Daneel and Giskard knew more. They remembered Elijah Baley, too. Now they must prevent his old enemies fro  plunging the galaxy into war - if the First Law of Robotics will let them...Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • The old First Empire lies shattered, swept away by the forces of First Foundation established by psychohistorian Hari Seldon, the only man to have foreseen the shifting patterns of the inhabited Cosmos.  But not even Seldon could have predicted the mutant menace of the Mule - a being of terrifying supernomal powers who can precipitate a savage struggle that can lay waste to entire star systems. 
  • Book 1 of David Starr, Space Ranger.  Earth is on the brink of catastrophe. The vital foodstuffs supplied by its Martian colony are being poisoned, causing mass panic and a crippled Earth economy. Working in secret, the ruling Council of Science sends David Starr, its youngest member, to the Martian farmlands to discover the truth behind the murders...Cover art by Peter Elson.
  • In this volume: Marooned Off Vesta; Nightfall; C-Chute; The Martian Way; The Deep; The Fun They Had' The Last Question; The Dead Past; The Dying Night; Anniversary; The Billiard Ball; Mirror Image. Cover art by Patrick Woodroffe.  This is a very scarce volume.  The most recently sold copy, with a dust jacket rated as 'poor',  sold for approximately 1230.00 AUD.  Later issued in two paperback volumes.
  • A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history: the colonisation of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City Detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers or their robotic companions. But when a prominent Spacer is murdered under mysterious circumstances, Baley is ordered to the Outer Worlds to help track down the killer. The relationship between Baley and his Spacer superiors, who distrusted all Earthmen, was strained from the start. Then he learned that they had assigned him a partner: R. Daneel Olivaw. Worst of all was that the "R" stood for robot - and his positronic partner was made in the image and likeness of the murder victim. Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • This volume contains Asimov's early works from the 1930s and 1940s: Homo Sol; Half-Breeds On Venus; The Imaginary; Heredity; History; Christmas on Ganymede; The Little Man on the Subway; The Hazing; Super Neutron; Not Final! Legal Rites; Time Pussy. Cover art by Christ Foss.
  • One hundred great sci-fi stories, featuring the best of the best: Robert Silverberg, Andre Norton, Fritz Leiber, Ambrose Bierce, A.E. Van Vogt, Norman Spinrad,  Roger Zelazny, Philip K. Dick, Philip Jose Farmer, Frderick Pohl, Isaac Asimov, Poul Anderson, Greg Benford, Brian Aldiss, Harry Harrison, Gene Wolfe,, Lloyd J. Biggle Jr., Jack London and so many more. Cover art by Jim Burns.
  • On the remote planet Solaria, the first murder for 200 years has been committed. The Solarians are Spacers with a a civilisation based on robots instead of slaves - and some very odd taboos and phobias. Into this strange set-up comes detective Elijah Baley, investigating the murder for his government. But Baley finds some aspects of life on Solaria difficult - even terrifying. As an Earthman, he's used to living underground. From the moment of his arrival, Baley's investigation becomes an ordeal of nerves under the pitiless glare of the naked sun... Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • Robot 0.2. Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics have since been programmed into real computers the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and used as the outline for a legal robotic charter. The Rest of The Robots...are not simple unthinking machines victimised by frightened men: Robot Tony is the first robot designed to perform domestic duties by the US Robots and Mechanical Men Corporation. Is it Tony's fault that the lady of the house where he's field tested falls in love with him? The Rest of the Robots...are positronic with brains of platinum-iridium. Independent. Precision eng8i9neered. Sensible. Rational... Robot Al  was intended for shipment to a mining outfit on the moon. Instead, he's loose in the mountains of Virginia...building from scraps of junk his very own, very dangerous disintegrator. Robot Lenny answers workaday questions in baby-talk. So why is Dr Susan Calvin, the world's top robopsychologist, fascinated by this messed up specimen of an industrial robot? The Rest of the Robots...Asimov's final, classic terrifying picture of robotic developments in the future...Cover art by Dennis Rolfe.
  • On the planet of Dawn, robots and humans coexist peacefully - until a humaniform robot - one of the most sophisticated manifestations of artificial intelligence ever created - is 'murdered'. Only one man on the planet Aurora had the means, the motive and the opportunity and he hires interplanetary detective Elijah Baley to prove he didn't do it. Armed only with his instincts, a quirky sense of logic and the immutable Three Laws of Robotics, Baley sets out to solve the case. Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • Isaac Asimov's facility as a scientific communicator is manifest in this work, in which he not only easily expresses scientific certainties about the Universe, but also reconstructs the long road that human beings have traveled to achieve them. The various theories about the age of the Earth and the Solar System are referenced in the more general framework of galactic evolution and then - finally - the great dilemma not yet resolved: How did the Universe begin? Will it end or is it eternal and infinite? With black and white photographs.

    
    
  • A volume of four of the Master's finest: It's Such A Beautiful Day: Nature had been forgotten in this electronic world of the future. Until one day, quite by accident, a young boy strayed outdoors and discovered what was there. Breeds There A Man? The physicist had arrived at a theory - very interesting, but highly improbable, but something not quite human seemed to be causing a bit of trouble...The C-Chute: The spaceship had to be recaptured from the aliens, which meant that somebody had to be a hero. But who would that be...and why? Belief: A college professor discovers that he has mysteriously acquired the ability to levitate. The problems that attend his newfound power make  for some hilarious  scenarios...