Isaac Asimov

//Isaac Asimov
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  • As well as the title story, this volume contains: The Prime of Life; Waterclap; That Thou Art Mindful of Him; Stranger in Paradise; The Life and Times of Multivac; The Winnowing; Marching In; Old Fashioned; The Tercentenary Incident; Birth of a Notion.
  • Comrade Pyotr Shapirov has a secret of vital importance to world science but the only man with the skill to extract it from his comatose brain is American scientist Albert Morrison.  Natalya Boranova, sent by Russian high command to get Morriosn's help will stop at nothing to ensure his co-operation.  But there is one major problem  -the necessity for human miniaturisation. Wrenched from a routine conference and transported to a vast underground Soviet City dedicated to scientific experiment, Morrison is shrunk to a microscopic fraction of normal size and p0laced in a specially designed 'submarine' to be injected into Shapirov's veins to travel deep into the uncharted regions of the brain - and with only twelve hours to complete his task, Morrison must find the origins of human thought. Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • Book IV of Foundation. (Chronological order.) The Foundation hurtles into conflict with the decadent, decrepit First Empire. In this struggle for power amid the chaos of the stars, man stands at the threshold of a new, enlightened life which could easily be put aside for the old forces of barbarism.Cover art by Chris Foss.
  • A feast for sci-fi fans of the 'Old Masters'.  In this volume: Foundation (Foundation I): For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying, and only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary The Foundation.  Foundation And Empire (Foundation II): Led by its founding father Hari Seldon, and utilising science and technology, the Foundation survived the greed and barbarism of its neighboring warrior-planets. Now cleverness and courage may not be enough. For the Empire - the mightiest force in the Galaxy - is even more dangerous in its death throes. Even worse, a mysterious entity called the Mule has appeared with powers beyond anything humanly conceivable. Who - or what - is the Mule? And how is humanity to defend itself against this invulnerable avatar of annihilation? Second Foundation (Foundation III): The Foundation lies in ruins - destroyed by a mutant mind bent on humanity’s annihilation. But it’s rumored that there’s a Second Foundation hidden somewhere at the end of the Galaxy, established as insurance to preserve the knowledge of mankind. Now a desperate race has begun between the survivors of the First Foundation and an alien entity to find this last flicker of humanity’s shining past - and future hope. Yet the key to it all might be a fourteen-year-old girl burdened with a terrible secret. Is she the Foundation’s savior - or its deadliest enemy? The Stars, Like Dust (Galactic Empire I): Biron Farrell was young and naïve, but he was growing up fast. A radiation bomb planted in his dorm room changed him from an innocent student at the University of Earth to a marked man, fleeing desperately from an unknown assassin. He soon discovers that, many light-years away, his father, the highly respected Rancher of Widemos, has been murdered. Stunned, grief-stricken, and outraged, Biron is determined to uncover the reasons behind his father’s death, and becomes entangled in an intricate saga of rebellion, political intrigue and espionage. The Naked Sun (Robot II): A millennium into the future, two advancements have altered the course of human history:  the colonisation of the Galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain.  On the beautiful Outer World planet of Solaria, a handful of human colonists lead a hermit-like existence, their every need attended to by their faithful robot servants.  To this strange planet comes Detective Elijah Baley, sent from the streets of New York with his positronic partner, the robot R. Daneel Olivaw, to solve an incredible murder that has rocked Solaria to its foundations.  The victim had been so reclusive that he appeared to his associates only through holographic projection.  Yet someone had gotten close enough to bludgeon him to death while robots looked on.  Now Baley and Olivaw are faced with two clear impossibilities:  Either the Solarian was killed by one of his robots - unthinkable under the laws of Robotics - or he was killed by the woman who loved him so much that she never came into his presence... I, Robot (Robot I):  A robot must not harm a human being; a robot must obey human orders; and a robot must protect its own existence - as long as that protection does not conflict with rules one and two. With these Three Laws of Robotics, humanity embarked on a bold new era of evolution that would open up enormous possibilities - and unforeseen risks. For the scientists who invented the earliest robots weren't content that their creations should remain programmed helpers, companions, and semi-sentient worker-machines. And soon the robots themselves, aware of their own intelligence, power and humanity, aren't either. As humans and robots struggle to survive together - and sometimes against each other - in earth and in space, the future of both hangs in the balance. Here human men and women confront robots gone mad, telepathic robots, robot politicians and vast robotic intelligences that may already secretly control the world. And both are asking the same question: What is human? And is humanity obsolete?
  • Book I of Foundation. For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire - both scientists and scholars - and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation. But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. Mankind's last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and be overrun - or fight them and be destroyed. Cover art by Fred Gambino.
  • Book I of Foundation. For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future - to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire - both scientists and scholars - and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation. But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. Mankind's last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and be overrun - or fight them and be destroyed. Cover art by Tim White.
  • This one volume comprises: 2001: A Space Odyssey, Arthur C. Clarke: On the Moon, an enigma is uncovered. So great are the implications of this discovery that for the first time men are sent out deep into our solar system.But long before their destination is reached, things begin to go horribly, inexplicably wrong... A Time of Changes, Robert Silverberg: In the far future, Earth is a worn-out backwater and humanity is spread across the galaxy on worlds that began as colonies, but now feel like home, each with its own long history of a thousand years or more, and each with its own unique culture. One of the strangest is on Borthan, where the founding settlers established the Covenant, which teaches that the self is to be despised, and forbids anyone to reveal his innermost thoughts or feelings to another. On Borthan, the filthiest obscenities imaginable are the words "I" and "me." For the heinous crime of "self-baring," apostates have always paid with exile or death, but after his eyes are opened by a visitor from Earth, Kinnall Darival, prince of Salla, risks everything to teach his people the real meaning of being human... The Day of the Triffids, John Wyndham: The triffids - strange plants, seven feet tall, with a high yield of quality oil, yet armed with a lashing sting that could kill or blind. When kept under control with their stings docked, they were an asset. Bill Masen had worked with triffids almost all his life yet a moment of carelessness landed him in hospital, temporarily blinded by a triffid sting. So he misses the spectacular  green meteorite shower. He wakes the next morning to a silent world, punctuated only by random screams, shouts and occasional shuffling - no traffic sounds and none of the usual bustle of a city hospital. Removing the bandages and discovering thankfully his sight has been restored, he ventures outside to find the streets full of wandering, sightless people. He begins to connect with the fortunate few who also luckily missed the meteorite shower - but they are very few. Civilisation is ended - and now the triffids are free to roam, kill and destroy unchecked, to make the Earth theirs... I, Robot, Isaac Asimov. The Three Laws of Robotics are perfect. A robot must not harm a human. A robot must obey a human. A robot must protect its existence as long as it did not conflict with the first two Laws. But mankind wasn't content with just programmed helpers, workers and companions. And as robotics technology develops to the point that robots are aware of their power and intelligence, the robots also want more. And so  the future of both hangs in the balance. Human men and women confront robots gone mad, telepathic robots, robot politicians, and vast robotic intelligences that may already secretly control the world. And both are asking the same questions: What is human? And is humanity obsolete? All are complete and unabridged.  Classic sci-fi by the very best.
  • What are our human roots? What is the history of Man? The first homonids - creatures who stood upright and used their hands - appeared on Earth  20 million years ago. The first humans - homo sapiens - walked on Earth only 150,000 years ago. Is there a missing link? Isaac Asimov, storyteller extraordinaire, traces the discovery of our human roots step by step. Illustrated with black and white sketches. Contents: The Stone Age; Neanderthal Man; Java Man and Peking Man; The Little Ape-Men; How It Began.
  • The master story teller, the one of the great sci fi writers of the age, explores why we've been fascinated by the idea of height since ancient times and how we learnt about outer space.  Here are the stories of the first attempts at flight, the launching of the first rockets and finally, the first time a man was sent into outer space. No 1. in the Longman series.